Physical Appearance?? - Page 2
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  1. #14
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    I never could figure out why people put pictures on there wall, that they would not put on there wall.

  2. #15
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    I've always wondered why the skilled trades attract a certain type of person.

    Where I live, many of the companies employ techs who are ex-cons and drug addicts and I've always had a huge problem with it. I'm 24 years old, clean cut, and I've never had any run-ins with the law. Nor do I drink, smoke or use drugs. Co-workers ask me what I do for fun if I don't drink, smoke, or use drugs. I tell them that I'm going to school part-time to get a bachelors degree and they laugh.

    It's really quite sad.

    This isn't to say that everyone with tattoos is a crackhead. But in my experience, it seems as if those with the most tattoos also happen to have criminal records and a history of substance abuse.

    If I'm working on new construction (installs), this isn't a huge issue for me. I'd be working on my own and drive my own vehicle to the job site. However, if I'm doing service work and driving a company van, I can't help but wonder if my heavily tattooed co-worker in the passenger seat has a "stash" on him.

    If we were to get pulled over and the van searched, I'm sure as hell not going down with him. Cops today don't screw around either. This is why I have a problem with it. When did it start getting popular for companies to stop doing background checks and drug tests?

    Perhaps I worry too much and need to find a government job that actually performs extensive background checks.

    Oh well.

  3. #16
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    I don't think that someone would NOT hire you over your tattoos but they may pick a clean cut person over you if it was a toss up.
    When I interviewed with the company I'm with now the owner did mention that he liked that i was clean cut. You are representing the company when you are at a customers house. I think twenty years ago this may have been a bigger issue.

    If your really dedicated, you would get a HVAC tattoo.

  4. #17
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    No mater if you have tats or not, you can emprove your personal persentation. With your dress and attatude.

  5. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by JR185 View Post
    I've always wondered why the skilled trades attract a certain type of person.

    Where I live, many of the companies employ techs who are ex-cons and drug addicts and I've always had a huge problem with it. I'm 24 years old, clean cut, and I've never had any run-ins with the law. Nor do I drink, smoke or use drugs. Co-workers ask me what I do for fun if I don't drink, smoke, or use drugs. I tell them that I'm going to school part-time to get a bachelors degree and they laugh.

    It's really quite sad.

    This isn't to say that everyone with tattoos is a crackhead. But in my experience, it seems as if those with the most tattoos also happen to have criminal records and a history of substance abuse.

    If I'm working on new construction (installs), this isn't a huge issue for me. I'd be working on my own and drive my own vehicle to the job site. However, if I'm doing service work and driving a company van, I can't help but wonder if my heavily tattooed co-worker in the passenger seat has a "stash" on him.

    If we were to get pulled over and the van searched, I'm sure as hell not going down with him. Cops today don't screw around either. This is why I have a problem with it. When did it start getting popular for companies to stop doing background checks and drug tests?

    Perhaps I worry too much and need to find a government job that actually performs extensive background checks.

    Oh well.
    I agree with you to a certain extent. I have never really felt like I fit in to the type of people that do this trade. I feel as if most of the guys I have ever worked with are rednecks, racists, drunks, and drug abusers, not well versed, have no concept of what it is to look nice or be clean cut. That is not to say that I haven't gotten along with the people I have worked with but I have not made many friends outside of work. The 1 company did do frequent drug screens and I fit in with the other employees there much better...I made serveral friends outside of work there and wish that other circumstances with the job weren't so bad that I could have stayed there. But working 60 hours a week plus driving 2-3 hours every day to and from work was just not for me.(the shop was only a half hour from my house, but they always started me and finished me up at the end of the day very far from my house and i didn't get paid for that drive either way, just putting this in so someone doesn't say well why did you take a job so far from home). Now where i do not agree with you is the corrolation between tats and drugs. I do not have any tats or piercings but I have friends that have both and are not drug addicts. I do think that there are plenty of stuck up homeowners that will judge and person by it though. It just depends on a companies clients. If you are going into middle class homes you are most likely fine but when you start going into the multi million dollar homes like I was doig alot of you are most of the time getting judged. But tats are not the only thing you are getting judged on...I always get judged on my age...nearly 30 but look like I could have just gotten out of college...but you have to win them over by showing you know more then anyone else that has ever been there before...once you do that..they'll do whatever you tell them.

  6. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by adamste81 View Post
    I do appriciate you taking the time to post, but I dont see spending thousands of dollars for laser removal, yes that is what it would cost, to go make $12/hr starting out because I am afraid of offending an up tight home owner. They are not disrespectful or vulgar tattoos, and if they dont want me there because of them then that is their problem. I dont think people are that ignorant much anymore, but if they think my tattoos will keep me from fixing their AC or heat pump their ignorance level is off the charts

    I would think it goes without saying (perhaps not) that if you want to make it in a customer-focused field, you defer your own opinions for those of the customer. You may think that a customer is ignorant, intolerant, of just plain bigoted, but they are the customer, and they are choosing or not choosing you and your company to do the work. That's the reality. A frank analysis of society will tell you if these ideas are based in fact and have merit.

    While we have TV shows about tattoos, you have to remember that many cable shows have VERY small audiences, and a portion of those audiences agree with the idea of body art. I believe that most home owners do not agree with that perspective, so I'm giving you the advice you seek.

    I only have one family member, ONE, who has tattoos. She has been to jail three times for theft, been through five drug rehab centers, and after ten years of bad behavior is only now becoming clean. She has a long way to go, as she inherited being a "stunod" from her Italian father.

    But, she still has all those tats. Are they a hindrance at a job interview? You bet. It speaks to the choices she has made and the length of time she has made them.

    My story I'm sure is not unique. From what I have come to understand through decades of life, the civilian tattoo is viewed by most of society as a self centered statement of a complex mixture of narcissism and self hatred. I personally know a lot of really great people who have tattoos. Some are believers, some not. If I did not know them, I might react like a customer who sees a stranger at their door, and immediately feels uncomfortable.

    But, I can tell you this: over 99% say they would never have gotten them if they knew what they know now.

    I'm sure you're probably a great guy, and this information bothers you a lot. I know that it would bother me, too. I think you deserve the answer to your question, though.

    You may want to read this page before you dismiss removal of a tattoo.

    http://www.yourplasticsurgeryguide.c...oo-removal.htm
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

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  7. #20
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    The New York representative of Employment Law Alliance, a professional legal organization based in San Francisco, said surging numbers of lawsuits surrounding personal appearance and style in the workplace highlight a growing debate about the right of employers to regulate appearance.

    The rep, Louis P. DiLorenzo, made a statement in conjunction with the March 22 release of ELA survey results, which showed that 16 percent of those surveyed nationally believed they had been victims of appearance-based discrimination on the job. Half of employers did not have a policy addressing the matter, and DiLorenzo said companies should have appearance requirements that align with job duties.
    DiLorenzo, a partner in the Syracuse-based law firm of Bond, Schoeneck & King, based his comments on the firm's experiences in its Albany, Buffalo, Syracuse, New York City and Long Island offices, which represent employers in labor and employment law matters.

    On the surface, this may look like another symptom of a litigious society, DiLorenzo said in a news release accompanying the study results. But it goes much deeper than that as employers and employees struggle over the authority of management to ensure customer satisfaction versus an employee's right to, for instance, sport a nose ring and a tongue stud while taking orders at the local fast-food restaurant.

  8. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhoIsThat? View Post
    The New York representative of Employment Law Alliance, a professional legal organization based in San Francisco, said surging numbers of lawsuits surrounding personal appearance and style in the workplace highlight a growing debate about the right of employers to regulate appearance.

    The rep, Louis P. DiLorenzo, made a statement in conjunction with the March 22 release of ELA survey results, which showed that 16 percent of those surveyed nationally believed they had been victims of appearance-based discrimination on the job. Half of employers did not have a policy addressing the matter, and DiLorenzo said companies should have appearance requirements that align with job duties.
    DiLorenzo, a partner in the Syracuse-based law firm of Bond, Schoeneck & King, based his comments on the firm's experiences in its Albany, Buffalo, Syracuse, New York City and Long Island offices, which represent employers in labor and employment law matters.

    On the surface, this may look like another symptom of a litigious society, DiLorenzo said in a news release accompanying the study results. But it goes much deeper than that as employers and employees struggle over the authority of management to ensure customer satisfaction versus an employee's right to, for instance, sport a nose ring and a tongue stud while taking orders at the local fast-food restaurant.
    I would expect employers that send individuals to homes to perform their work, and act as salesmen/representatives of their company, to have no trouble receiving judicial agreement that regulating appearance is a critical aspect of employment with their company.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

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  9. #22
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    This is a very interesting thread. Tattoos are for sure more socially acceptable today than years before us. But there is a lot of stereotyping that goes hand and hand with tattoos.

    I am heavily inked but pretty well known and successful. All I can tell you is, people will judge you...sad but true. I think it is more important that you are clean cut than the fact that you have a few tattoos. By this I mean hair combed, shaved, clean uniform and boots...this will go a long way.

    Funny really, I have always been an athlete, I am in shape, I am a great dad to three little ones, make lots of money, good husband, etc...but yet people will judge you because you have tattoos.

    Even the tattoo parlors tend to cater to the low class, just because you like the ink doesn't make you are the dredge of society. But, lets be honest...first impressions mean a lot to the general public.

    My advice...be clean cut, smile, be polite and knowledgeable. You will be okay.
    Live each day like it is your last, for one day you will be right!

  10. #23
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    Intriguing post, and I am drawn to post. This subject comes up a lot in this field. It has been my experience that first impressions are huge and you should do everything in your power to make a good one. As the job market becomes tighter and more competitive you will need every weapon in your arsenal to nail down a good job. This being said wear a long sleeve shirt for your interview and ask for long sleeve uniforms. I would air on the side of caution and let know one know about your art until you feel it is safe.

    I would not hire you based on tattoos but I might think about it.
    I STARTED WITH NOTHING, AND I STILL HAVE MOST OF IT!

  11. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by JR185 View Post
    I've always wondered why the skilled trades attract a certain type of person.

    Where I live, many of the companies employ techs who are ex-cons and drug addicts and I've always had a huge problem with it. I'm 24 years old, clean cut, and I've never had any run-ins with the law. Nor do I drink, smoke or use drugs. Co-workers ask me what I do for fun if I don't drink, smoke, or use drugs. I tell them that I'm going to school part-time to get a bachelors degree and they laugh.

    It's really quite sad.

    This isn't to say that everyone with tattoos is a crackhead. But in my experience, it seems as if those with the most tattoos also happen to have criminal records and a history of substance abuse.

    If I'm working on new construction (installs), this isn't a huge issue for me. I'd be working on my own and drive my own vehicle to the job site. However, if I'm doing service work and driving a company van, I can't help but wonder if my heavily tattooed co-worker in the passenger seat has a "stash" on him.

    If we were to get pulled over and the van searched, I'm sure as hell not going down with him. Cops today don't screw around either. This is why I have a problem with it. When did it start getting popular for companies to stop doing background checks and drug tests?

    Perhaps I worry too much and need to find a government job that actually performs extensive background checks.

    Oh well.
    I don't know where you live but where I'm from I don't know of any one tech that fits that description.
    There are some techs that I know that are pretty heavily inked although mostly not visible to the customer.
    I do not know of any one tech that is a drug user/abuser or at least doesn't have the outward appearance of being under the influence.
    If someone wants to party like a rock star on their time that's their business but they better be in top shape in the morning when they get in the truck.
    Out of the 4 of us where I work I'm the only one without any tattoos.
    My boss has 3 non visible including his sons name in Kanji, his astrological sign and the Italian and Canadian flags.
    The other tech that works with us has quit a few but the only visible one is a Celtic cross on his forearm.
    My apprentice also has an inspirational saying in Kanji on his back which is again not visible with a shirt on.
    I believe that your outward appearance such as being neatly dressed, a friendly hello, and a positive attitude will do much more than any tattoos on how a customer perceives you.

  12. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by thump_rrr View Post
    I don't know where you live but where I'm from I don't know of any one tech that fits that description.
    There are some techs that I know that are pretty heavily inked although mostly not visible to the customer.
    I do not know of any one tech that is a drug user/abuser or at least doesn't have the outward appearance of being under the influence.
    If someone wants to party like a rock star on their time that's their business but they better be in top shape in the morning when they get in the truck.
    Out of the 4 of us where I work I'm the only one without any tattoos.
    My boss has 3 non visible including his sons name in Kanji, his astrological sign and the Italian and Canadian flags.
    The other tech that works with us has quit a few but the only visible one is a Celtic cross on his forearm.
    My apprentice also has an inspirational saying in Kanji on his back which is again not visible with a shirt on.
    I believe that your outward appearance such as being neatly dressed, a friendly hello, and a positive attitude will do much more than any tattoos on how a customer perceives you.
    You know what I know. Many techs I work with in commercial have tattoos. They are some of those "great people" I mentioned.

    You know it, and I know it.

    But, it's as if this is "our secret."

    Most owners of nice homes think of individuals like my niece and her multiple "sp**m donors" when they think of tattoos.

    So, this is a disconnect between the many good people that you and I know, and the types of people that our CUSTOMERS know.

    This means that this can be a sticking point in the minds of some customers. In their minds, they not only want a clean cut tech, but the idea of being clean cut extends to an "ink free" tech.

    Anyone considering a field where they are constantly in contact with strangers who may not perceive these designs as "typical" for a great person might stop and think before they ink.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

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  13. #26
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    While we're on the subject, what motivates a person to get a tattoo?
    What is that tattoo supposed to tell others (what it actually tells others is a different issue)?

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