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Thread: Coal to Propane

  1. #14
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    Apr 2017
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    arent coal stoves only viable in places with high quality anthracite?

    ive seen exactly one coal stove... was in Erie PA, and i was like 10 years old. the heat output was astonishing. Old stacked stone foundation basemen...stove was probably 50 years old or more at the time.

    i was under the impression that you could barely burn lumps of lignite in the first place? i thought it needed to be crushed down to dust, dried out and burned with lots and lots of airflow.

    bituminous coal coal burns fine( albeit lower btu/lb), but it will rapidly build up a flamable coating inside your flue?

  2. #15
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    Mar 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by queequeg152 View Post
    bituminous coal coal burns fine( albeit lower btu/lb), but it will rapidly build up a flamable coating inside your flue?
    Some bituminous coal has a higher btu content than anthracite. not by much, but a little. the problem is that most bituminous coal is dirty and contains more water and other impurities.
    Experience - knowing when to get the hell out of the way and plug your ears. "Don't be a sissy. Turn it on!"

    Poodle Head Mikey - "the world is well populated with the unknowing and the uncaring and the stupid."

    Jtrammel - "I’m going to sell hvac systems derp derp derp"
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  4. #16
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    Is there an emoji for 'thread way off the rails' ?
    Back to the OP, what do you have for a heat loss...aka...show your work
    "Sometimes what's right is what's left after you do everything wrong"--Robin Williams

  5. #17
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    Experience - knowing when to get the hell out of the way and plug your ears. "Don't be a sissy. Turn it on!"

    Poodle Head Mikey - "the world is well populated with the unknowing and the uncaring and the stupid."

    Jtrammel - "I’m going to sell hvac systems derp derp derp"
    BBeerme - "every time he opens his mouth, he reminds me of a cow without the fart bag."

  6. #18
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    Burning coal over grates with natural draft requires both under and over combustion air and at substantial volume. Achieving this large air flow volume with natural draft requires substantial open internal passages through the HX. Large passages result in less surface areas. So coal-over-grate coal burning efficiencies tend to be low. In typical residential / small commercial applications it is under 50% and often closer to 30%.

    Coal produces soot And ash so the insulation effects tend to both accumulate rapidly and and to be tolerated longer - because the relatively large air passages for the flue gas are not prone to clog. Stack temps, high to start with, tend to get extreme if the flue passages are not kept very clean.

    PHM
    -------



    Quote Originally Posted by jtrammel View Post
    There must be a significant loss of efficiency with coal, eh? Like How hot does the flue get?
    PHM
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    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

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  8. #19
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    Jan 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by joemach View Post
    I need to put a quote together for a customer that wants to switch from coal boiler to propane. I did a heat load, but the house is very broken up and I feel a little uncertain as to the actual heat loss. He goes through 9-10 tons of coal a year. So I thought maybe I could do a cross check for heat load based on the amount of coal he uses.

    Any ideas on how I would do this? This is is central Pennsylvania, State College.
    Do they also get their potable hot water from the boiler? Do they run the circ 24/7, or only on a call for heat.

    Some homes with coal heat, are kept at a high temp most of the heating season simply because its easier to do, then to control the coal feed properly. Specially on units that the auger is wearing out.
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  9. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by pctech View Post
    Sure does cannot burn it in my state any more they wont even sell it to you.
    If its banned in your state, it must have just been done. There are several places in your state advertising coal stoves for sale, and they also sell coal. Perhaps its just your city that has banned it.
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  10. #21
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    I don't keep up on all the codes Been-there because i don't service sell or install such stoves.
    And many in my area don't any more.
    A few still sell them yes but not many.
    the coal they sell is pea coal not the old chunky stuff.
    We burn mostly oil natural gas propane or old fashioned electric.
    I know our governor would love to ban it but who knows if a total ban will be done in his tenner.

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