Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst 123456
Results 66 to 73 of 73
  1. #66
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    20,052
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    I took a couple pics today of behind the air handler but forgot to take the air handler pics and other trunk line. Ill do it when I go back and trim out.

    Like I said earlier, we use flex branch lines and flex for the majority of the returns. TESP on 2nd stage/high is .51, .4 on 1st stage/medium and .3 on fan only/low. 3-14x20 and 1-14x14 return grilles and a 20x25x4 HW media filter.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Heating/Cooling Services Inc.
    www.andersonhvacservice.com

  2. Likes Ga-HVAC-tech liked this post
  3. #67
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
    Posts
    38,828
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by jtrammel View Post
    Flex saves a lot of time and materials, and there's really not a thing wrong with it as long as it's designed for and installed correctly.

    The plenums and trunk lines will be metal but all branches and the majority of the returns will be flex. That's just the way it be.

    I can spend that "savings" on other stuff that will actually improve the system.

    Everything will be wrapped in foil back R8 anyway so it'll look "factory"

    Something like 15 bags of flex going in on this one and 65' of supply trunk amd about 25' of return trunk. Likely two 3 or 4' plenums if they'll fit.

    Furnace and AC is on the bill of materials, haven't decided on what model yet though.

    26 holes to cut in plaster, geez I'm getting tired thinking about it.
    I was enjoying the thread... until you said cutting holes in plaster...
    I HATE cutting holes in plaster...
    Ga-HVAC-tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    Beware the Dunning-Kruger effect

  4. #68
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    1,269
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by Ga-HVAC-tech View Post
    I was enjoying the thread... until you said cutting holes in plaster...
    I HATE cutting holes in plaster...
    I don't mind. Oscillating tool takes care of it. Go slow and all is well.

    The 2nd is there to protect the 1st. DTOM

  5. #69
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
    Posts
    38,828
    Post Likes
    Thankfully... I have enough customers out here in the burbs... I rarely see a plaster house anymore!
    Most of the plaster homes are downtown Atlanta...

    I do like the idea of the diamond sawzall blade in a battery sawzall (Milwaukee FUEL M12... which is a truly special tool)!

    Hope I never have to deal with plaster again... however if I do... well I will try those blades!
    Ga-HVAC-tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    Beware the Dunning-Kruger effect

  6. #70
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Billington Heights, NY
    Posts
    14,907
    Post Likes
    consider a roto zip. it's dusty but cuts a clean hole, any shape, any size, in any thing (bit dependent)
    Experience - knowing when to get the hell out of the way and plug your ears. "Don't be a sissy. Turn it on!"

    Poodle Head Mikey - "the world is well populated with the unknowing and the uncaring and the stupid."

    Jtrammel - "Im going to sell hvac systems derp derp derp"
    BBeerme - "every time he opens his mouth, he reminds me of a cow without the fart bag."

  7. #71
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    1,269
    Post Likes
    I have yet to deal with solid plaster. My every encounter with plaster always has lathe right behind it. Seen guys try to use a sawzall and drop the lid

    The 2nd is there to protect the 1st. DTOM

  8. #72
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
    Posts
    38,828
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    consider a roto zip. it's dusty but cuts a clean hole, any shape, any size, in any thing (bit dependent)
    Last major plaster job I did... this is what I used... found a special bit for plaster... about 1/4" in dia, had bits of carbide in it... worked great... dusty though! We did as much of the cutting from the top with a box under... some of it was too close to ceiling joists... so we had to do that from the bottom.
    Still had to do some mud touch-up (no painting)...
    Ga-HVAC-tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

    Beware the Dunning-Kruger effect

  9. Likes zamoramax liked this post
  10. #73
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Billington Heights, NY
    Posts
    14,907
    Post Likes
    I just used a diamond bit on a 1" porcelain sink. Cut it like butter. PPG is absolutely necessary.
    Experience - knowing when to get the hell out of the way and plug your ears. "Don't be a sissy. Turn it on!"

    Poodle Head Mikey - "the world is well populated with the unknowing and the uncaring and the stupid."

    Jtrammel - "Im going to sell hvac systems derp derp derp"
    BBeerme - "every time he opens his mouth, he reminds me of a cow without the fart bag."

  11. Likes Ga-HVAC-tech liked this post
Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst 123456

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor MagazineThe place where Electrical professionals meet.