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  1. #1
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    HELP! AC drip pan threads glued???

    So my ac has been turning off because of the safe-t-switch filling with water. My drain line was clogged. The pvc pipes connect to my drip tray via a threaded nipple. So I cut the pvc pipe some 6 inches from the nipple, then I went to loosen the pvc pipe from the nipple at the drain pan. Well as soon as I applied torque the drain pan snapped. The threaded lines were glued on! I called the company who orignally did the work some 1-2 years ago and they said all pvc lines are glued to the threads. My reply, that makes no sense why would there be threads then and how would I ever remove it? The guy said sorry i've been in the industry for over 20 years and this is just how it is done.

    I think the company should install a new drain pan for free and this shouldn't be my fault.

    So the question is, is it normal to glue pvc threads where the drip line meets the drip pan as the company is claiming? I looked up the plumbing code (not sure it applies to ac units) and it says (code 316.1.1, threaded joints) thread tape or thread lubricant inteded for plastics should be used on all plastic threads.

    Doesn't say to use glue anywhere.

    Please advise and help. Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    Billington Heights, NY
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    it is NOT normal to glue threads. Ever. It is bad practice and improper installation. Sounds like the company owes you a drain pan. The plumbing code applies to condensate drain lines also.

    Quote Originally Posted by IPC for ABS
    605.12.3 Threaded joints.
    Threads shall conform to ASME B1.20.1.
    Pipe-joint compound or tape shall be applied on the male threads only.
    Quote Originally Posted by IPC for CPVC
    605.16.3 Threaded joints. Threads shall conform to
    ASME B1.20.1. Schedule 80 or heavier pipe shall be permitted
    to be threaded with dies specifically designed for
    plastic pipe, but the pressure rating of the pipe shall be
    reduced by 50 percent. Thread by socket molded fittings
    shall be permitted. Approved thread lubricant or tape shall
    be applied on the male threads only.
    Quote Originally Posted by IPC for PVC
    605.22.3 Threaded joints. Threads shall conform to
    ASME B1.20.1. Schedule 80 or heavier pipe shall be permitted
    to be threaded with dies specifically designed for
    plastic pipe, but the pressure rating of the pipe shall be
    reduced by 50 percent. Thread by socket molded fittings
    shall be permitted. Approved thread lubricant or tape shall
    be applied on the male threads only.
    Quote Originally Posted by IPC for condensate drains
    [M] 314.2.2 Drain pipe materials and sizes. Components
    of the condensate disposal system shall be cast iron, galvanized
    steel, copper, cross-linked polyethylene,
    polybutylene, polyethylene, ABS, CPVC or PVC pipe or
    tubing. All components shall be selected for the pressure
    and temperature rating of the installation. Joints and connections
    shall be made in accordance with the applicable
    provisions of Chapter 7 relative to the material type. Condensate
    waste and drain line size shall be not less than
    3/4-inch (19 mm) internal diameter and shall not decrease in
    size from the drain pan connection to the place of condensate
    disposal. Where the drain pipes from more than one
    unit are manifolded together for condensate drainage, the
    pipe or tubing shall be sized in accordance with Table
    314.2.2.
    Chapter 7 pretty much reiterates the above quotes.
    Experience - knowing when to get the hell out of the way and plug your ears. "Don't be a sissy. Turn it on!"
    Poodle Head Mikey - "the world is well populated with the unknowing and the uncaring and the stupid."

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  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    Why would they have to put a new pan in? Gluing it was stupid, but they didn't break it.
    I wish I had a $1.00 for every response I deleted.....

    "Decidedly Superior in a twisted pathetic way".....

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  6. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    Emerald Coast
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    .

    Could it be caulk?
    ..
    Do not attempt vast projects with
    half vast experience and ideas.
    ...

  7. #5
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by beshvac View Post
    Why would they have to put a new pan in? Gluing it was stupid, but they didn't break it.
    There was no glue visible on the outside. Looking at it, it looked like a normal threaded fitting, so whether it was me who went to unscrew the fitting or someone else, it would have broke because of their screw up. They glued something that never should have been glued.

  8. #6
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    Jul 2002
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    Yuma, AZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by beshvac View Post
    Why would they have to put a new pan in? Gluing it was stupid, but they didn't break it.
    Booby Trap.
    "I have never let my schooling interfere with my education."
    Mark Twain
    NEVER STOP LEARNING.

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  10. #7
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by Sleuth View Post
    .

    Could it be caulk?
    ..
    NO, it was the blue PVC glue.

  11. #8
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    Aug 2002
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    Sorry but never heard of Blue PVC cement and the bottom line is you broke it.
    Yes it shouldn't be glued
    Clean outs should be installed
    Unions if needed.

    The last one to touch it owns it.

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  13. #9
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    Thread Starter
    google blue pvc cement and you will see a bunch, it is sold everywhere. I tried to post a link for home depot but apparently no links allowed. I'm not a professional hvac but have seen and used blue cement too many times to count. How have you never heard of it?

  14. #10
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    Mar 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by pecmsg View Post
    Sorry but never heard of Blue PVC cement and the bottom line is you broke it.
    Yes it shouldn't be glued
    Clean outs should be installed
    Unions if needed.

    The last one to touch it owns it.
    Blue PVC cement is a "hot" type typically used in wet environments where the glue may come into contact with moisture before it is cured.

    If it shouldnt be glued, and it is, it's improper installation and not the fault of the guy breaking it.
    Experience - knowing when to get the hell out of the way and plug your ears. "Don't be a sissy. Turn it on!"
    Poodle Head Mikey - "the world is well populated with the unknowing and the uncaring and the stupid."

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  16. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    it's improper installation and not the fault of the guy breaking it.
    If I had been the one to break it the home owner would hold me responsible. Only good thing in this situation is it actually happened to the home owner and not the tech.

    Yes it is wrong but I believe most of use here would not have broken it as we probably would not have put that much torque on it.

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  18. #12
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    Dec 2002
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    I have never in my life glued PVC threads, but I don't ever try and unscrew the fitting to drain the water, even if it were glued. I cut the PVC, drain the water and use my Gallo gun to blow it out, then install a T in the line if it doesn't have one.
    __________________________________________________ _______________________
    “Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards". -Vernon Law-

    "Skilled Labor Isn't Cheap, Cheap Labor Isn't Skilled" - Unknown


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  20. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by dstew619 View Post
    I'm not a professional hvac
    You can argue with them all you want but nothing would hold up in court. Improper installation? Yes. Their fault you broke the drain pan? No.

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