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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    56
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    How Not to Unload a 8' Brake

    Embarrassed to post this but maybe it will help someone out. I finally found a 8' Brake to replace my 4' tennsmith, highlo used to load it however I had nothing to unload it. It was my intention to jack up the rear, use 2 crate dollies, tilt the trailer down, and slide it off. I got it 2" up off the deck when it began tipping and as I found out, there was no stopping it. My intentions were not smart and could have been much worse. My leg was pinched, got out, went to hospital, thankfully no broken bones, just heavy bruising and swollen, occurred 5 days ago and still have a limp. The picture of my leg did not do justice, it swelled huge, and my ankle was dark after a few hours.

    A proper way to do this after I done some trouble shooting the same day...Call a tow truck company! I called a couple excavator companies but they all wanted way too much (Understandable). Ended up paying $150 for the tow truck and I did not even need to mess with it.




  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Broomall, PA
    Posts
    1,651
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    Ouchie! I hate when stuff like this happens, and it usually happens to a one man band (like me). If it were me, I'd mount that on either a stake body or a small, low open trailer and just work off the trailer, as opposed to trying to haul it, load it/unload it from a closed in trailer.
    Or have some muscle meet you at the job, which I know isn't easy or convenient to coordinate.
    Glad it wasn't worse.
    Uh...Google it yourself!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    56
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by STEVEusaPA View Post
    Ouchie! I hate when stuff like this happens, and it usually happens to a one man band (like me). If it were me, I'd mount that on either a stake body or a small, low open trailer and just work off the trailer, as opposed to trying to haul it, load it/unload it from a closed in trailer.
    Or have some muscle meet you at the job, which I know isn't easy or convenient to coordinate.
    Glad it wasn't worse.
    This brake is staying in the shop, it will not be traveling to jobs. I work local so all my sheetmetal is done back at my shop (Garage). When I get a box truck or bigger trailer I may install the 4' inside that to do small sheet metal work on the job. Yes, I am a one man band aswell and it certainly makes things difficult at times.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
    Posts
    38,067
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    My hobby is metal working... I have a metal working machine shop at my home.

    Moving a 1500# mill or a 1200# lathe is not easy... thankfully I have both of them on stands that have outrigger wheel attachments (custom made the stands).

    At the hobby machinist forum (google it)... there are lots of threads about moving machines...
    CAREFULLY is the general idea... grin!
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Your comfort, Your way, Everyday!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    460
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    Better bolt it down or run longer timbers under the legs because it's so top heavy. Glad you weren't hurt any more than you were.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    483
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    Thanks for posting jhosk.

    Might keep one of us from making the same mistake.

  7. Likes ga-hvac-tech liked this post
  8. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    56
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by servicefitter View Post
    Better bolt it down or run longer timbers under the legs because it's so top heavy. Glad you weren't hurt any more than you were.
    Was planning on removing the timbers and bolting it to the concrete once it finds its exact resting place. They are very very top heavy, and we all know this, but we all have done stupid, hopefully like scoobie said, might keep someone from loosing a leg.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Roanoke, VA
    Posts
    159
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    We hired a roll back to pick up our used 8 ft brake. He dragged it on the deck with his winch and gravity and his winch slid it off onto the shop floor. It took 4 of us to push it to the final resting place. Being on wooden 4x4 blocks helped with moving it.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    397
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    When I had may break and shear delivered, I had them delivered to the supply house so they could be unloaded with a fork lift.

    I then called a tow truck company with a roll back to pick them up and deliver them to my shop.

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