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  1. #1
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    Honeywell XL100CU Controller and CBUS Networking

    I have a job with some Neopsis drivers communicating over the CBUS protocol to a whole bunch of XL50 and XL100CU controllers. I just had a XL100CU controller go bad. I just had a few questions regarding this controller.

    1.) Is the XL100CU controller obsolete? Or can they still be purchased brand new? I know I found some on Ebay, but I thought I would still ask.

    2.) I know these controllers are programmed with CARE. I believe you need the original project files to reload the control program right? There is no way to upload the program from these right? I assume if we don't have the original project files we are basically screwed unless we want to rewrite everything from scratch?

    3.) I was looking through the control system to go through the requirements to upgrade this controller to a BACnet controller, and install a JACE. I am seeing a lot of point data for smoke management coming into these controllers, but nothing is linked up in the existing Supervisor station. So I was wondering if this old CBUS stuff supported peer to peer communication? The reason I ask, is because I see a lot of things regarding smoke management, but nothing is hard wired other than the damper actuators. It seems like the main smoke management controller sends a request for evacuation over the CBUS network. Is this possible?

    Thanks for the help!
    J. King

  2. #2
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    Over this side of the pond we can still get XL100C controllers, not sure about the CU designation (for UL approval perhaps). So I should imagine you could at least get the 'C' type over in the states.
    PM me if you need to know a price.

    I have an old 'B' series controller knocking around you can have for the sum of $0000 if you like. But the shipping from England to Ohio may be prohibitive.
    Its a bit mucky but I think it works, (If you want it I will fire it up and see)

    On the second point, you dont necessarily need CARE or a project file, it is possible to back up the controllers when plugged in locally. You use a program called XL-Online. This creates a folder on your laptop containing around 12 seperate files.
    But if you dont have one of these either then you are screwed, yes.
    I did a bit of research on the Neopsis a while back, I thought it had a way of performing a backup to the supervisor, unless I am mistaken try looking for a folder with the exact same name as the failed controller and containing files with .pra .ral .rap .adl .alx etc. If you have this then you have a backup of that controller.
    You cant use this to reverse engineer the strategy though.

    Thirdly, yes the XL range use global point data transfer to send data to other XL controllers.
    If your smoke management controller is not a Honeywell XL controller then your XL100 may well be an OpenLink controller but I would suspect you would see a sticker on it with Q9200A.

    Keith

  3. #3
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    When you say that the controller has "gone bad" are you sure it's truly dead? These things are typically very reliable. Are there any leds lit in the bottom right hand corner? Have you connected to the B-Port with XL Online? The controller has a communication module that can be replaced if that is the source of difficulty. If the controller's database has been corrupted it's possible that a backup has been flashed on the controller and that it can be restored. If all else fails I believe that new controllers are available for replacement purposes.

    The XL5000 did support a form of peer to peer communication via "global" points, both analog and digital independent of any front end. It's interesting that you see a lot of smoke management stuff. I'm not familiar with the Neopsis drivers but wonder if a system configured with them and a Supervisor can be Listed for service in a smoke control system. Keep in mind that for a system to be Listed it's not enough to have parts that are Listed, they need to be installed as a system to work together. Modifying a Listed system runs the real risk of creating liability for those involved. There's a reason that Honeywell, JCI, and Siemens have checklists and matrices for design of smoke control systems.

    You might want to have the owner contact the original contractor (probably Honeywell) for a.pjt file for the system, it costs nothing if they say no. If you can't get the project backup it would be possible to program the controller as a standalone and add it to the Bus. (Yes, the global points will just start working). This would require quite a bit of detective work but it is possible.

  4. #4
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by CraftyNRingwise View Post
    When you say that the controller has "gone bad" are you sure it's truly dead? These things are typically very reliable. Are there any leds lit in the bottom right hand corner? Have you connected to the B-Port with XL Online? The controller has a communication module that can be replaced if that is the source of difficulty. If the controller's database has been corrupted it's possible that a backup has been flashed on the controller and that it can be restored. If all else fails I believe that new controllers are available for replacement purposes.

    The XL5000 did support a form of peer to peer communication via "global" points, both analog and digital independent of any front end. It's interesting that you see a lot of smoke management stuff. I'm not familiar with the Neopsis drivers but wonder if a system configured with them and a Supervisor can be Listed for service in a smoke control system. Keep in mind that for a system to be Listed it's not enough to have parts that are Listed, they need to be installed as a system to work together. Modifying a Listed system runs the real risk of creating liability for those involved. There's a reason that Honeywell, JCI, and Siemens have checklists and matrices for design of smoke control systems.

    You might want to have the owner contact the original contractor (probably Honeywell) for a.pjt file for the system, it costs nothing if they say no. If you can't get the project backup it would be possible to program the controller as a standalone and add it to the Bus. (Yes, the global points will just start working). This would require quite a bit of detective work but it is possible.
    Basically all of the analog inputs are intermittently going way out of range. The fan, and the compressor keep cycling on and off very rapidly. The controller is behaving very strangely. At first I thought something was shorted, and it was taking everything down. I literally isolated everything from the controller, and things were still going all over the place. So I had another AHU controller with the same exact program, that I switched with this one, and the problems followed the controller. So the controller is definitely bad.
    J. King

  5. #5
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by Keith D View Post
    Over this side of the pond we can still get XL100C controllers, not sure about the CU designation (for UL approval perhaps). So I should imagine you could at least get the 'C' type over in the states.
    PM me if you need to know a price.

    I have an old 'B' series controller knocking around you can have for the sum of $0000 if you like. But the shipping from England to Ohio may be prohibitive.
    Its a bit mucky but I think it works, (If you want it I will fire it up and see)

    On the second point, you dont necessarily need CARE or a project file, it is possible to back up the controllers when plugged in locally. You use a program called XL-Online. This creates a folder on your laptop containing around 12 seperate files.
    But if you dont have one of these either then you are screwed, yes.
    I did a bit of research on the Neopsis a while back, I thought it had a way of performing a backup to the supervisor, unless I am mistaken try looking for a folder with the exact same name as the failed controller and containing files with .pra .ral .rap .adl .alx etc. If you have this then you have a backup of that controller.
    You cant use this to reverse engineer the strategy though.

    Thirdly, yes the XL range use global point data transfer to send data to other XL controllers.
    If your smoke management controller is not a Honeywell XL controller then your XL100 may well be an OpenLink controller but I would suspect you would see a sticker on it with Q9200A.

    Keith
    I definitely would like to know whether the Neopsis driver can perform backups at the Supervisor. That would be VERY helpful. I have never used XL Online before. Is that a licensed software that is apart of the CARE package? Or can I download it somewhere?
    J. King

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    "LICENSING
    Excel Online (XL Online) can be ordered either as included in one of the main
    applications such as CARE and Lizard or as separate software tool. When
    registering a CARE or Lizard license, XL Online is automatically registered.
    When ordering XL Online separately, it must be registered at the Honeywell License
    server in a separate step.
    Registering will be done by using XL Online and the Honeywell License Server in
    parallel. The licensing process is based on three parts:
    • Voucher number
    Included and printed on XL Online CD label
    • Reference key
    Automatically created on the hardware where XL Online has been installed
    • License key
    Automatically created by the Honeywell License server when performing the
    steps described in the Registering the First Time section.
    In case of software enhancements, the user can upgrade an existing license to a
    version with desired functional content. Once a year a lost license can be replaced
    by a new one. In addition, the user can also transfer a XL Online license from one
    computer to another. "

    sounds like it certainly is not a freebie.

    http://www.honeywell.be/DocsAdobePDF...line_ug_EN.pdf

  7. #7
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by amigo View Post
    "LICENSING
    Excel Online (XL Online) can be ordered either as included in one of the main
    applications such as CARE and Lizard or as separate software tool. When
    registering a CARE or Lizard license, XL Online is automatically registered.
    When ordering XL Online separately, it must be registered at the Honeywell License
    server in a separate step.
    Registering will be done by using XL Online and the Honeywell License Server in
    parallel. The licensing process is based on three parts:
    Voucher number
    Included and printed on XL Online CD label
    Reference key
    Automatically created on the hardware where XL Online has been installed
    License key
    Automatically created by the Honeywell License server when performing the
    steps described in the Registering the First Time section.
    In case of software enhancements, the user can upgrade an existing license to a
    version with desired functional content. Once a year a lost license can be replaced
    by a new one. In addition, the user can also transfer a XL Online license from one
    computer to another. "

    sounds like it certainly is not a freebie.

    http://www.honeywell.be/DocsAdobePDF...line_ug_EN.pdf
    Thanks for the reply. I figured it was something that had some hoops to jump through.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    J. King

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