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  1. #1
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    Kelvinator Belt Driven Condensing Unit.

    SightGlass is very thick ,,, (like honey). Anybody have any idea why this would be. Has been like this since I can remember & Operation has never Faulted.
    The primary function of the design engineer is to make things difficult for the fabricator and impossible for the serviceman.

  2. #2
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    Are you referring to the compressor oil sightglass and the oil looks like the thickness of honey?

    It could also be just very old oil or the result of magic oil additives administered over the years.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by icemeister View Post
    Are you referring to the compressor oil sightglass and the oil looks like the thickness of honey?

    It could also be just very old oil or the result of magic oil additives administered over the years.
    Sorry ,, I should have elaborated.

    The Liquid Line SightGlass has the appearance of the Liquid inside it is very thick.
    The primary function of the design engineer is to make things difficult for the fabricator and impossible for the serviceman.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by fridg View Post
    Sorry ,, I should have elaborated.

    The Liquid Line SightGlass has the appearance of the Liquid inside it is very thick.
    OK. That's old enough so it should have flare connections, so why not disconnect the SG and pour out a sample of whatever it is?

  5. #5
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    Large volume oil carry-over would be my first guess.

    How is the oil level in the compressor?

    PHM

    ---------

    Quote Originally Posted by fridg View Post
    SightGlass is very thick ,,, (like honey). Anybody have any idea why this would be. Has been like this since I can remember & Operation has never Faulted.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    Large volume oil carry-over would be my first guess.

    How is the oil level in the compressor?

    PHM

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    Full from my View ,,, the oil sight glass is a little discoloured( the glass itself not the oil. But the Liquid in the LLSG isn’t discoloured.
    The primary function of the design engineer is to make things difficult for the fabricator and impossible for the serviceman.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by icemeister View Post
    OK. That's old enough so it should have flare connections, so why not disconnect the SG and pour out a sample of whatever it is?
    Would like to but the Client is a Large Mom & Pop Produce Market & would only approve downtime to the Box (6mtrs x 4mtrs) it was deemed necessary.

  8. #8
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    Try draining oil until the crankcase sightglass is about 1/3 to 1/2 filled. Run the compressor and watch the oil level to see if it increases. If it does - remove some more oil.

    Is the liquid line sightless clear? A gin-clear fluid? Because that is what good refrigerant looks like.

    Is it's clear but 'thick' / viscous looking ?

    PHM
    --------


    Quote Originally Posted by fridg View Post
    Full from my View ,,, the oil sight glass is a little discoloured( the glass itself not the oil. But the Liquid in the LLSG isn’t discoloured.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    Try draining oil until the crankcase sightglass is about 1/3 to 1/2 filled. Run the compressor and watch the oil level to see if it increases. If it does - remove some more oil.

    Is the liquid line sightless clear? A gin-clear fluid? Because that is what good refrigerant looks like.

    Is it's clear but 'thick' / viscous looking ?

    PHM
    --------
    LLSG is not clear(full) but there is no flashing. The Fluid inside is just very slowly rolling around. The colour of the Fluid has a slight tinge of yellow to it.
    The primary function of the design engineer is to make things difficult for the fabricator and impossible for the serviceman.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by fridg View Post
    LLSG is not clear(full) but there is no flashing. The Fluid inside is just very slowly rolling around. The colour of the Fluid has a slight tinge of yellow to it.
    I am pretty confident it is just oil trapped in it ,but I have never seen a Liquid Line Sight Glass to be so lazy when only 3/4 Full.
    The primary function of the design engineer is to make things difficult for the fabricator and impossible for the serviceman.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by fridg View Post
    I am pretty confident it is just oil trapped in it ,but I have never seen a Liquid Line Sight Glass to be so lazy when only 3/4 Full.
    That's what we call river flow in the sightglass and i will occur when the refrigerant flow is low compared to the full flow capacity of the SG, even when the liquid is subcooled. The yellowish color is probably from the yellow mineral oil in the compressor, which was common back in the day.

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  13. #12
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    Perhaps it is a job which was piped back in the old days when things were done properly and the correct refrigerant velocities are just less than you are accustomed to seeing. <g>

    BTW: why is the LL sightglass only 3/4 full ?

    PHM
    -------


    Quote Originally Posted by fridg View Post
    I am pretty confident it is just oil trapped in it ,but I have never seen a Liquid Line Sight Glass to be so lazy when only 3/4 Full.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

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  15. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poodle Head Mikey View Post
    Perhaps it is a job which was piped back in the old days when things were done properly and the correct refrigerant velocities are just less than you are accustomed to seeing. <g>

    BTW: why is the LL sightglass only 3/4 full ?

    PHM
    -------
    You could be right. It was piped up more than 30years ago & no insulation on any of the PipeWork , it has Copper Saddles securing it.

    SightGlass has never been completely full & we have been doing PM’s here for well over 5 years. I conduct periodic Leak Testing OnSite & have never found a leak on the Sytem ,,, repairs have been few & far between & only Evaporator Fans have failed that I can recall.

    System seems happy & maintains Temps well & doesn’t have an extended Run Time to reach Temp & Off Cycle seems normal also.
    The primary function of the design engineer is to make things difficult for the fabricator and impossible for the serviceman.

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