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  1. #1
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    Makita cordless cut out tool

    I just ordered the Makita XOC01Z and the 193449-2 dust collector for it.

    I'm hoping it's going to work better than my rigged RotoZip. I have the corded RotoZip with the dust filter kit. The filter is useless after about 30 seconds it clogs and spews dust everywhere. So, I used the filter adapter and taped it to my shop vac. That seems to work pretty well, but I still have to hold the tool away from the plaster or drywall to see what I'm cutting and this ends up making some mess.

    The new Makita with the clear dust collector will allow me to attach the vacuum and hold the base to the sheet rock. Not to mention it's cordless!
    I will report back to report how well it works. I have a big install the next couple weeks cutting plaster w/ wood lath board. That's going to be fun to cut in...

    "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing" Socrates

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  2. #2
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    I have one but without the dust collector attachment. I'm keen to see how yours goes as the dust kicking around is one downside of mine.

  3. #3
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    Is it faster than using a hackzall, or is it mainly because you want better precision?


  4. #4
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    Not sure how you are using this, but my best solution is if I am installing ceiling supply or return grill is to have someone underneath with a cardboard box while I cut with a hackzall from the attic. Almost zero dust.
    Can someone please explain to me -
    Why is there never enough time to do it right the first time, but plenty of time to do it twice?


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  5. #5
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    So your plastic guard doesn't look like a pair of 50 year old safety glasses, take the guard off before the first use, and spray/polish/wipe off with rain X, Pledge, or something similar, and only blow the guard clean after that, never wipe. Otherwise it will scratch up in short order and you'll be back to where you were with the other one.
    "Sometimes what's right is what's left after you do everything wrong"--Robin Williams

  6. #6
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by Bels View Post
    I have one but without the dust collector attachment. I'm keen to see how yours goes as the dust kicking around is one downside of mine.
    I will let you know.

    Quote Originally Posted by rjk_cmh View Post
    Is it faster than using a hackzall, or is it mainly because you want better precision?
    Quote Originally Posted by joemach View Post
    Not sure how you are using this, but my best solution is if I am installing ceiling supply or return grill is to have someone underneath with a cardboard box while I cut with a hackzall from the attic. Almost zero dust.
    Yes, I typically use the box under but this is plaster with wood lath. Not a chance I'll be cutting it with a hacksaw or recip-saw. I'll probably burn through a few $15 bits, but it's worth it. I will have my helper in the attic misting water on the bit from above to help keep it cool.
    "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing" Socrates

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  7. #7
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by STEVEusaPA View Post
    So your plastic guard doesn't look like a pair of 50 year old safety glasses, take the guard off before the first use, and spray/polish/wipe off with rain X, Pledge, or something similar, and only blow the guard clean after that, never wipe. Otherwise it will scratch up in short order and you'll be back to where you were with the other one.
    Great advice, thanks.
    "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing" Socrates

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mgenius33 View Post
    I will let you know.


    Yes, I typically use the box under but this is plaster with wood lath. Not a chance I'll be cutting it with a hacksaw or recip-saw. I'll probably burn through a few $15 bits, but it's worth it. I will have my helper in the attic misting water on the bit from above to help keep it cool.
    Hate plaster with wood lath. The only trick I found was to find a way to keep the lath from shaking and go real slow with a sawzall and find blade. I have had good luck sometimes and sometimes not.
    Can someone please explain to me -
    Why is there never enough time to do it right the first time, but plenty of time to do it twice?


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  9. #9
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    Thread Starter
    First one from Amazon was a dud. The motor was loud and vibrating like bad bearings. So, I picked one up from Home Depot and it sounds normal like my regular RotoZip.

    The dust attachment is tiny, not sure how much it will collect, but I'll find out I guess.
    "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing" Socrates

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  10. #10
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    if you can afford/find them I highly suggest a diamond rotary bit. They'll cut anything, even porcelain. It may help in areas that have very hard lath and/or a more cement based plaster.
    Experience - knowing when to get the hell out of the way and plug your ears. "Don't be a sissy. Turn it on!"

    Glennac - Failed my biology test today: They asked, "What is commonly found in cells?" Apparently "BL*** people" wasn't the correct answer.
    Poodle Head Mikey - "the world is well populated with the unknowing and the uncaring and the stupid."

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    if you can afford/find them I highly suggest a diamond rotary bit. They'll cut anything, even porcelain. It may help in areas that have very hard lath and/or a more cement based plaster.
    Marc,

    The big problem is the dust, at least for me, anyway. Finding a blade to cut is secondary in my opinion. The main difficulty I have had with plaster (old homes) is cutting through wood lath without shaking the wall or ceiling and it breaking 2 feet away.

    The only way I have been able to keep the dust under control is to go slow with a sawzall blade while finding a way to stop the wood lath from shaking.

    Just my take on the whole thing.
    Can someone please explain to me -
    Why is there never enough time to do it right the first time, but plenty of time to do it twice?


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  12. #12
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    With lath and plaster, I cut the plaster first. Then there are 2 options:
    1. If you have enough room and the screw holes will be covered, I screw a plywood square (or rectangle) the size I want the hole to be (on the inside) with a 2" border. Screw into each lath with a drill point (self tapper) screw. Then cut all the lath, remove the screws/square. If you can't do that:
    2. You have the exposed plaster. On the left side of the hole, cut each lath, leaving about 3/8". Then on the right side, cut them straight thru-always with a new sharp blade (blades are cheap). Then you can just snap them off on the left, snap them with a pair of pliers, or score with a razor knife and snap.
    "Sometimes what's right is what's left after you do everything wrong"--Robin Williams

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