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  1. #14
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    38,946
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    We don't put filters or media cabinets against the furnace. We rarely use or reuse 1" filters. Our supplier has a transition made for smaller units that goes from the 14x18 opening to a 16x25 media cabinet. For higher airflow, they sell a 6" basepan, you cut out the side you need air through and they have a transition from the basepan & side of furnace to a 20x25 media. Got 2 waiting to go in this week,

    Our tech rep says we can run up to 1400 CFM with the 14x18 opening so we will also put a Right Angle Air Bear against the side of the furnace. That way the whole 20x25 media has an even flow of air on it. Like this:
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Beatrice, NE
    Posts
    6,009
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    Thread Starter
    Nice looking install. I have put in a couple Air Bear right angle filters before but my experience has been they don't filter as well. I have had better luck with the RP products. I gave them an option for the RP unit, they went for it at first then changed their mind on it.

    Quote Originally Posted by BaldLoonie View Post
    We don't put filters or media cabinets against the furnace. We rarely use or reuse 1" filters. Our supplier has a transition made for smaller units that goes from the 14x18 opening to a 16x25 media cabinet. For higher airflow, they sell a 6" basepan, you cut out the side you need air through and they have a transition from the basepan & side of furnace to a 20x25 media. Got 2 waiting to go in this week,

    Our tech rep says we can run up to 1400 CFM with the 14x18 opening so we will also put a Right Angle Air Bear against the side of the furnace. That way the whole 20x25 media has an even flow of air on it. Like this:

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    16,674
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by buttwheat View Post
    Good looking install. I rarely ever see anyone on here ever use base cans why not?
    I use base cans or both sides on any upfow furnace. It’s hard enough to get within TESP range using bottom/side or side/side much less only using one side.

  4. Likes buttwheat, jacob-k liked this post
  5. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Western Wa.
    Posts
    3,497
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    Quote Originally Posted by BNME8EZ View Post
    Thanks: Ok, I'll bite, what are base cans?
    It is mounting the furnace on a metal box for better airflow and way easier on the knees to service . see below (none of the pictures are mine just random pics of the interweb)





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  6. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Caledonia WI
    Posts
    1,782
    Post Likes
    You've made a huge improvement on air flow by changing the way it's connected into the trunk lines (seems many contractors are far more interested in cash flow than air flow).
    I install a base can on anything over 60,000 btu, but they don't have to be as big as that (you'd hardly ever have head room for a coil).
    It's not what you're capable of doing that defines you, it's what you do on a daily basis.

  7. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Beatrice, NE
    Posts
    6,009
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by buttwheat View Post
    It is mounting the furnace on a metal box for better airflow and way easier on the knees to service . see below (none of the pictures are mine just random pics of the interweb)





    OK, I have seen those, just never heard them called a base can. I thought you were talking about something like a pump up for furnaces, like those corner blocks. If I have to raise a furnace to get air in the bottom I use a plywood box or 2x? frame. All of the base cans I have been around are noisy, like it amplifies the sound. That's one of the reasons I put a foam pad under the furnace, to absorb vibrations.

  8. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    16,674
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    I use a 6” base so I can get a 20”x25” cutout.

  9. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Beatrice, NE
    Posts
    6,009
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by billg View Post
    You've made a huge improvement on air flow by changing the way it's connected into the trunk lines (seems many contractors are far more interested in cash flow than air flow).
    I install a base can on anything over 60,000 btu, but they don't have to be as big as that (you'd hardly ever have head room for a coil).
    Yeah I really could have made a bunch of money on this job. With the 1/2" pad I put under the furnace the new equipment was the same size as the old so no duct changes were needed to match up to the equipment. I thought about it but couldn't let it go. The new system is quieter than the old one was.

  10. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Beatrice, NE
    Posts
    6,009
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    Thread Starter
    Quote Originally Posted by jtrammel View Post
    I use a 6” base so I can get a 20”x25” cutout.
    I have done that before but this wasn't that big of a system.

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