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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
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    4
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    I am an old electrician teaching myself i-Vu to replace a niagara/tridium mess. I did have some assembly programming and digital logic training in college but that was a long time ago. It still seems way easier that it should be.

    I would try i-Vu/ Automated logic if you get a chance.

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wi
    Posts
    40
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    Back when I got started the only thing I had was the Honeywell Grey Manual. To this day, I still recommend that manual starting off.

    There are three areas you really need to button up in order to progress towards the higher levels in this field.

    1) Understand how controls (DDC) actually control HVAC equipment. This seems to be one of the biggest gaps in the skillset of most new techs. Even "HVAC" guys have to relearn some things as DDC control is quite different then electromechanical or basic programmable stat control.

    2) It sounds like you have the electrical knowledge down but I would brush up on low voltage circuit logic. Safety circuits are a very misunderstood part of this field and were the reason for a lot of my service calls back when I did service.

    3) Once these two things are down learn the different types of logic blocks and programming design patterns. I recommend practicing on a BAS software that does not automatically create code for you as you will learn more. I cut my teeth on Alerton using Visuallogic and programming in Visio. These days I recommend EasyIO because the software is free and you can pick up a cheap controller to practice on from almost anywhere.

    These 3 skills will prepare you to do basic installation, field point-to-point checkout, and basic programming.

    From here you can go down many paths the design side, advanced programming, IT, systems integration etc.

    All said the above skills can be learned to a functional level within 3 months if you are studying 3-4 hours a night.

    Once you've past this point let us know and we can point you towards the front-end, database, UI funfest...

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wi
    Posts
    40
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxBurn View Post
    He has a podcast out called Building Automation Monthly. If you know nothing in the field this is likely the easiest intro into controls. It's a free podcast but sometimes a bit dry as it's mostly just him and he talks slow so I bump it up to about 1.3x.
    Lol, love this, and I thought I talked way to fast, or at least that's what I've been told. Don't worry I'm going to start singing and telling jokes now just for you :-P

  4. #30
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1,119
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    Quote Originally Posted by philzito View Post
    Lol, love this, and I thought I talked way to fast, or at least that's what I've been told. Don't worry I'm going to start singing and telling jokes now just for you :-P
    More guests would help too. Or maybe you do, I'm nowhere near caught up.
    Scott Jalbert
    WebCTRL ninja
    AX and Smartstruxure newb

    The S in IoT stands for Security

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wi
    Posts
    40
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxBurn View Post
    More guests would help too. Or maybe you do, I'm nowhere near caught up.
    Ya it depends what episode you're at. I wouldn't wish the first 10 episodes upon anyone. Now that I'm past episode 100, I've figured out my tempo and voice.

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    5
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    Most HVAC equipment distributors will offer training and the tools to start up their equipment. Classes are usually around a couple thousand dollars but you will be certified and have the tools to start up the equipment properly. Please don't try to teach yourself and startup OEM equipment. I see mechanical contractors doing this and 90% of the time have to hire a certified OEM contractor to finish the job. OEM controllers always seem to have nuisances that you will not get right unless you get trained or have a lot of experience.

    If you want learn building automation systems then you just need to pick a control company and learn their stuff. Optergy offers a nice BACnet BAS that is configurable using a web browser and has a ton of different features. Siemens Desigo has nice graphics, works well with Siemens controllers, and ok reports but is very expensive. Tridium has the biggest market at this point but configuring seems to be difficult and also very expensive for the different licenses.

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