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Thread: Oil Seperator?

  1. #14
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    Iv'e always considered oil seperators pretty close to useless if they are not 100% effective what good are they. Make the compressor run out of oil next month instead of tomorrow. If you are around a job you can keep an eye on all the compressors oil levels and adjust them until every level is stabilized. All systems have to be piped with oil return in mind.

  2. #15
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    Thread Starter
    Yeah, that kind of makes sense.

    I Guess for 100% efficiency you have other requirements to meet?

  3. #16
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    A little something on Oil Systems
    Attached Images Attached Images

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  5. #17
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    To confuse things a little more, the Oil separator can also be the oil sump, for screw compressors, basically the oil separator section is to return oil to the sump for re-use in the compressor and minimise the amount of oil circulating through-out the whole system, oil in condensers and evaporators(especially) can and do inhibit the heat exchanger performance. So try to keep as little oil from discharging into the condenser and evaporator by capturing it at the compressor discharge, separating it from the high pressure refrigerant but (with semi-hermetic screws, using the discharge pressure to create oil pressure and feeding it to the screw rotors (compression seal) bearings for lubrication, cooling for discharge gas and also some sound attenuation, it returns by venting to suction pressure, passing through the rotors and out of the discharge again into the oil separator then sump, then back round the compressor oil circuit again, via a filter of course. Some refrigerant are not very miscible with oil so it is best to try and keep the oil where you need it rather than allowing it to circulate around the system (ammonia and oil don't mix well)

  6. #18
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    Thread Starter
    Cool, that makes sense.

    Thank you.

    How would I differentiate a receiver and oil separator if they are wrapped in insulation? Location in the circuit?

  7. #19
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    Oil separator connects to the discharge line before the condenser.......

    The receiver is after the condenser.

  8. #20
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    Typically an oil separator is in the discharge line from the compressor and before the condenser it will have superheated discharge gas with large pipe connections, a receiver will be in the liquid line outlet from the condenser with liquid line size connections and will then feed the TEV or EEV via the filters or drier cores. The liquid receiver can also be an economizer too, this store condensed liquid refrigerant from the condenser and the vapour can be fed back into the compressor directly (to an intermediate compression port ) as a partially compressed gas , this allows for further sub-cooling of the remaining liquid that is then fed to the evaporator.

  9. #21
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    Thread Starter
    Cool, well that makes sense.

    Thank you.

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