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  1. #40
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    Jun 2005
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    South Jersey
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    I've used the G-5 for years to pull charges up to 800 pounds from chillers and vrf systems. If you use push-pull and then use a 50 foot length of copper tube, submerged in a 5 gallon bucket of ice and water for your discharge to the tank, you'd be surprised at how fast that machine will move refrigerant. Another trick is to chain several tanks together, fill one up until things get slow, then dump it to the others as liquid and close the valve again. You do need more than one scale for this, though. I also use a carpet blower to keep air moving across my tanks on big jobs.

    Of course, the best solution is to buy a big industrial recovery system, but that's not really feasible for most of us.
    It Is What It Is

  2. #41
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    maroon lazyboy
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    The ice might not last long enough.

    For a bit of trivia, I think you can get down to -40 degrees with simply ice and salt. Get a pint glass and fill it with ice cubes. Add a bit of water then begin salting it. Watch your thermometer. Simple and easy experiment. You may be surprised at the readings you get.

    Been a long time since I've done it. Can't remember the lowest temp I achieved, but it won't stay there for long at all, because your ice will be melting so fast.
    The Fahrenheit “0°” is based on the temperature of icy, salty, watery brine.

  3. #42
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    Bay Area California
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    How salty? How can you possibly maintain that concentration?


    Quote Originally Posted by knave View Post
    The Fahrenheit “0°” is based on the temperature of icy, salty, watery brine.
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

  4. #43
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    Dec 2009
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    maroon lazyboy
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    How salty? How can you possibly maintain that concentration?
    I didn’t know. But I just looked it up and legend has it that it was equal parts salt, water, and ice, lol

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    Columbus, Ohio
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    How salty? How can you possibly maintain that concentration?
    It's a salt brine solution that is unable to dissolve any additional salt; I.E. a saturated sodium chloride and water solution. Once you achieve maximum salt saturation in water, the freeze point of the resulting solution is 0 degrees Fahrenheit. That's why locales that get below-zero temperatures have to resort to salts other than sodium chloride, and sometimes just use sand or grit for their roads.

  6. #45
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    Bay Area California
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    Pretty sure the max low temp for [table] salt and water is below 0*F before it freezes.


    Quote Originally Posted by rjk_cmh View Post
    It's a salt brine solution that is unable to dissolve any additional salt; I.E. a saturated sodium chloride and water solution. Once you achieve maximum salt saturation in water, the freeze point of the resulting solution is 0 degrees Fahrenheit. That's why locales that get below-zero temperatures have to resort to salts other than sodium chloride, and sometimes just use sand or grit for their roads.
    If you were a real tech, you'd solder a relay on that board and call it good to go.

    I do a triple evac with nitro to remove non condensables.

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    Columbus, Ohio
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    Pretty sure the max low temp for [table] salt and water is below 0*F before it freezes.
    Well, that was always the story as I understood it, however I decided to do some research after your comment and found this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brine#Refrigerating_fluid - it says that the saturated "eutectic" solution will begin to freeze at -6F, so I was incorrect about the actual concentration. However, here's info about the zero degree solution: http://www.physlink.com/education/askexperts/ae64.cfm - apparently Mr. Fahrenheit was unable to saturate his solution fully before it started to ice over.

    EDIT: After further research, this site indicates that the solution may have been ammonium chloride and water: https://www.straightdope.com/columns...-significance/

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