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  1. #14
    Join Date
    May 2017
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    4
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    Thread Starter
    Thank you everyone who has responded. This is all very useful information. It seems i need to focus on state specific requirements then and do alot more research.

    Im aware of licensing, however, was not aware that it may not ever be possible to become licensed in some states even if i do eventually become a US citizen.

    Thanks again,

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Houston, Tx
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    276
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    yea our PE board system is kinda geared towards only USA accreditation. this is why you always hear the anecdotes about some old Russian mechanical engineer driving a taxi cab in New Jersey.
    what you can get... is US universities opening "satellite" campuses in other countries that offer US accredited degrees... Texas A&M for example has a petrolium engineering program in the UAE.

    the PE boards are very very state specific though so you should speak with the board Tennessee specifically.

    IDK how it works in the UK, but im guesing there is more recognition across the EU?

  3. #16
    Join Date
    May 2017
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    4
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    Thread Starter
    As far as im aware most degrees across europe are fairly similar. Im not sure however if accreditation across countries is recognised. I presume it all depends on what sector of the industry you work in like you say.

    I believe my degree is recognised by the washington accord which gives me a little bit of hope my degree and chartership are worth something over there.

    Again thanks for all the help.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    N. Canada
    Posts
    873
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    Quote Originally Posted by ga-hvac-tech View Post
    The English have 'Whitworth'... British sports cars were made to those dimensions...
    Since you're known to toy a bit with firearms, ga-hvac, you'll know that
    the Whitworth name is also associated with an accurate
    mid 19th century percussion firearm.

    Sub-calibre (for its day of .58s to 70s), the .45 cal was
    probably one of the first truly effective sniper rifles.

  5. Likes ga-hvac-tech liked this post
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