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Thread: R22 Conversion

  1. #53
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    This is a wolverine:


    Name:  wolverine-crouching.jpg
Views: 55
Size:  84.3 KB


    Quote Originally Posted by Red Man View Post
    I have no idea what you're talking about. Sporlan uses wolverine gaskets on their solenoid valves now. It's a metal gasket, at least it feels like metal, so it doesn't leak. I think Alco still uses O rings, I can't remember.

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  3. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBeerme View Post
    This is a wolverine:


    Name:  wolverine-crouching.jpg
Views: 55
Size:  84.3 KB
    Looks like you can get a lot of gaskets out of one wolverine... if you can catch it.

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  5. #55
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    I'm not a big fan of MO99. For AC's, 407C seems to get the job done just file. For medium and low temp where 404a or 507 used to be the go-to refrigerants before the EPA said "no more", I am liking 407F. Discharge temps are higher than 404 or 507 (or 407A for that matter), but still lower than R-22. Capacity, efficiency, and mass flow are pretty good. I'd suggest retrofitting a system with 407F and evaluate it before making your final judgment. The only downside to 407F, which is shared by 407A, is that the oil has to be (mostly) replaced with POE.

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  7. #56
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    I would like more discussion on what you are replacing these leaking gaskets with .

  8. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Galt View Post
    I would like more discussion on what you are replacing these leaking gaskets with .
    Whatever the manufacturer sends. Why?

    You should replace them before they leak. It's not the new refrigerant or oil that makes them leak, it's the fact that they absorbed R22. When that R22 is removed, it causes them to leak.

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