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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    243

    Thumbs up Commercial Food Equipment Tech Workload

    Hello,

    I am a commercial refrigeration tech and I have often wondered what kind of workload you food equipment techs have.......do you guys stay busy throughout the year? Just curious because I gave thought to applying to company that does refrigeration and food equipment service.

    Look forward to your thoughts.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Over the river and through the woods
    Posts
    116
    tis quiet at the moment but usually I work 45 to 50 hrs. a week through out the year. I think everyone is slow right now.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Memphis TN USA
    Posts
    6,945
    I work for an installation company. Installation is slow, so start-ups aren't there right now. I am still busy. They try to keep OT to a minimum all year, but the only time I did not get OT in the last 2 years was nov and dec
    If the superheat ain't right it ain't charged right.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Western NC
    Posts
    2,504
    I have been wondering the same thing.


    The company I work for advertises refrigeration, HVAC, and food equipment. We do mainly refrigeration. And we are slowin up pretty good now....


    I have been lookin into the food equipment stuff for maybe some good classes but nothin in this area....
    I fully support the military and the War on Terrorism.


    If you don't know, then don't do. If you don't know and still do, then be prepared to pay someone else a lot to undo what you did and then do it right.

    If you do know, then do. But do it right. Otherwise, you may not be doing it long.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Memphis TN USA
    Posts
    6,945
    Quote Originally Posted by iraqveteran View Post
    I have been lookin into the food equipment stuff for maybe some good classes but nothin in this area....
    Food service is easy. A furnace is a furnace, whether it is heating your house or baking your bread. There is a knob on most thermostats for calibration. There are many specialty safeties, but if you understand the dangers the safeties are common sense.

    Then there is tech support. The important thing to remember there: if the guy on the line is not helpful, find a polite reason to hang up and call back. You might get a better techie.
    If the superheat ain't right it ain't charged right.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Western NC
    Posts
    2,504
    Quote Originally Posted by kim View Post
    Food service is easy. A furnace is a furnace, whether it is heating your house or baking your bread. There is a knob on most thermostats for calibration. There are many specialty safeties, but if you understand the dangers the safeties are common sense.

    Then there is tech support. The important thing to remember there: if the guy on the line is not helpful, find a polite reason to hang up and call back. You might get a better techie.
    Thats what I have used thus far.


    Just my general knowledge of how things work, how and why safeties are there, and common sense. I have also used tech support a time or two.



    But I would still like to get some good classroom hours in......its always good to add book knowledge to street smarts. Especially when dealing with old run down equipment....makes it a little easier to talk to the owner and maybe get them to upgrade to some newer stuff.....
    I fully support the military and the War on Terrorism.


    If you don't know, then don't do. If you don't know and still do, then be prepared to pay someone else a lot to undo what you did and then do it right.

    If you do know, then do. But do it right. Otherwise, you may not be doing it long.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    ga
    Posts
    80
    Our business has been a little slow. We do full kitchen equipment plus refrigeration. We do factory service and other brands. that helps to keep busy. Kitchen equip. is not that bad to service but dealing with lots of grease and manager wanting repair yesterday but don't want to shell out much cash. Same as hvac. I work 45 hours average. But when economy was booming I was working 60+ week. And expect the middle of the night call.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Over the river and through the woods
    Posts
    116
    Food service is easy. A furnace is a furnace, whether it is heating your house or baking your bread. There is a knob on most thermostats for calibration. There are many specialty safeties, but if you understand the dangers the safeties are common sense.


    it is'nt as easy as it looks....ovens bake unevenly, bakery oven rack lifts fail, fryers leak, dishwashers crash (usually around 7pm saturday night) steamers don't steam and there are a ton of different manufacturers that may or may not share their secrets

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Huntingdon, PA
    Posts
    8
    I work for a company that does both hot and cold side with the food service techs. It can be a frustrating and dirty job. You will get called out any time of the day and night and usually end up working on a piece of equipment that is old with no wiring diagrams or any sort of manuals or tech support, or laying on a greasy fast food store under a dirty fryer at noon on a Friday while the managers are breathing down your neck and employees tripping over your feet. I average well over 50+ hours a week and enjoy my job tremendously, but to call this job easy could not be further from the truth.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Huntingdon, PA
    Posts
    8
    I work for a company that does both hot and cold side with the food service techs. It can be a frustrating and dirty job. You will get called out any time of the day and night and usually end up working on a piece of equipment that is old with no wiring diagrams or any sort of manuals or tech support, or laying on a greasy fast food store under a dirty fryer at noon on a Friday while the managers are breathing down your neck and employees tripping over your feet. I average well over 50+ hours a week and enjoy my job tremendously, but to call this job easy could not be further from the truth.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    26
    I can't say that I made a mistake by getting into food service from only HVAC/R.
    If you are able to reason, read, and learn it is only a matter of time before you have become skilled. Biggest thing on this side is sooooo many manufactures of equip.. This makes parts a pain but basics is still basics. They all pretty much only have so many ways of doing the same function.

    I know of one local Co. that sends there Techs for a lot of Certifications to hang on the wall but they can't become any more skilled on all the other name brands than I have from getting out there with a can do attitude and phone #'s for the equip. tech support.

    I love it. Being able to do both hot and cold sides is a career advancement in my opinion.
    As far as work hrs. I've been doing this for 6 yrs. 10hrs OT per wk avg in Spring, Summer, Fall. Steady 40hrs in Winter. I have to brag on my employer, guaranteed 40hrs even if we are a few hours short of work in winter.
    One last thing to say though, You have to make sure you are OK with getting into some greasy fryers--it will find its way onto you and your tools.
    I avg. 2 calls a week in that situation.

    If it fits, wear it!

    I always say that, "I would rather complain about working too much, than not working."

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Seneca Falls, NY
    Posts
    10
    You guys looking to cross over look at www.cfesa.com or go to the new discussion forum and register. The forum is new and doesn't have a lot of activity yet but will soon. Also, you cannot see all of the threads unless you register. the forum is at http://bb.cfesa.com

    Wayne

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Northern Ontario
    Posts
    128

    its nice to see different stuff

    I am a licensed refrig.. and licensed gas fitter in canada... if you have your licenses they cant take them away from you so expanding your knowledge into other areas is only making you a bigger asset... I fixed a rooftop heating unit today ... a deep fryer... installed some stainless in a new kitchen..... blew out condensers on a walk in cooler.... and picked up material for a gas piping job in a kitchen tomorrow... these jobs all feed off eachother and it keeps your job from geting boring..... Ive never had a slow time in 14 years work...the grease can suck .... but fixing stuff in a pressure situation is alot of fun when you are done.... when there are 10 people running around a kitchen and you are in charge of getting the oven going beer fridge ice machine fryer etc etc you get alot of job satisfaction ....kep up the good work its worked well for me cheers
    You miss 100% of the shots you don't take...

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