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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Leonardtown, MD
    Posts
    12
    Post Likes
    I have never regretted buying a wet dry vac, when the first one finally gave up the ghost, I got another one within a week. When I cleaned my wood burning fireplace, I'd sweep up the big chunks, but used the wet dry vac for the rest, of course a good filter installed in the wet dry vac, if that hadn't occurred to you. Makes cleaning a wood burning fireplace 10 times easier.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    7,264
    Post Likes
    Most shop vacs. are wholly unsuitable for use with fireplaces, gas fireplaces, woodstoves, pellet stoves, coal burners or oil burning appliances. Soot particles can get down to 0.3 microns, which is HEPA level filtration. This is the level pro chimney sweeps use. A shop vac. can allow these sub-micron particles to blow right past a shop vac. filter and remain suspended in air for over 8 hrs. Also, beware ashes can keep coals alive for over a day. If you try to vacuum and there is a hot coal, it can be fanned into a burning, stinky filter smoking the house out in seconds.

    Fireplaces and stoves are just like anything else--properly installed, operated and maintained they almost never have major safety problems. The most dangerous appliance in most homes is a atmospherically vented gas water heater with a draft hood.

    Every home should have a low level UN-listed CO monitor per floor within 15 LF of each sleeping room. Store bought CO alarms are death alarms designed to alert only once you've met the medical definition of CO poisoning- 10% COHb.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Billington Heights, NY
    Posts
    14,811
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by hearthman View Post
    Most shop vacs. are wholly unsuitable for use with fireplaces, gas fireplaces, woodstoves, pellet stoves, coal burners or oil burning appliances. Soot particles can get down to 0.3 microns, which is HEPA level filtration. This is the level pro chimney sweeps use. A shop vac. can allow these sub-micron particles to blow right past a shop vac. filter and remain suspended in air for over 8 hrs. Also, beware ashes can keep coals alive for over a day. If you try to vacuum and there is a hot coal, it can be fanned into a burning, stinky filter smoking the house out in seconds.
    The hot coal problem is a real concern. My ex-wife found out the hard way/

    Most if not all, shop vacs have a hepa style filter used for small particles such as ash and drywall dust.
    Experience - knowing when to get the hell out of the way and plug your ears. "Don't be a sissy. Turn it on!"

    Poodle Head Mikey - "the world is well populated with the unknowing and the uncaring and the stupid."

    Jtrammel - "I’m going to sell hvac systems derp derp derp"
    BBeerme - "every time he opens his mouth, he reminds me of a cow without the fart bag."

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    8
    Post Likes
    My main problem with wood fireplace is smoke. Thus, I personally like electric fireplace. It has less hassle than wood fireplaces.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Raleigh,NC.
    Posts
    401
    Post Likes
    around 35 years ago, the gas company was touting that an open draft fireplace produced a -7% efficiency!
    It's true , you get radiant heat for a few feet and eventually heating that builds from the ceiling downward.
    And as said before, during and after it goes out, that air going up the chimney is being paid for with modern energy dollars.
    But , there is nothing like an open fireplace for the "cozy, homey" feel.
    remember, with electronics; when its brown,its cooking and when its black, its done!!!

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    1
    Post Likes
    I am dealing with the same dilemma. Gas or Wood burning? The wall i am going to install this fireplace on is an internal living room cathedral wall with an 18 foot height. I have natural gas already piped to that wall but i'm still hesitant on the gas fireplace. Nothing beats a real wood fireplace but the 2 big variables for me are: Inside or outside wall? venting/chimney. source of the wood - do you have a natural source of free wood or are you purchasing wood every year? There is also a lot more cleanup/maintenance with a wood fireplace compared to gas, just flip a switch and you have a fire. If you are on an outside wall, have a chimney and have access to free wood - go for the wood burning

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