Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 14 to 18 of 18
  1. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    133
    Plus it doesn't waste all the water of a continuious flow unit. Probably a little more maint. but I can live with that.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    724

    Hmm What is old in now NEW

    "Does anybody have an opinion, one way or the other, about the position I'm taking -- that better control, and automatic reduction in the RH setpoint in response to cold outdoor temps (in other words: full integration with the full Carrier setup) is a better thing than the "precision" and possible efficiency (water in vs. water out) gains of the Honeywell??"


    I must admit I enjoyed reading this post very much. If you old timers remember I was recommending powered Humidifiers over seven years ago for the exact same reason explained here—reduction in air flow into the living space and many of you disagreed! It is again encouraging to now read (2009) posts that agree with what was posted years ago.

    However, the question on an outdoor sensor is also misunderstood. My recommendation is DO NOT bother with one unless it is connected to the Weather Channel. The reason being it takes about a day for most tight homes to see a significant change in their indoor Relative Humidity; therefore, if you wait/rely on the outdoor sensor to turn it down, it is TOO LATE. This is why in today’s tight homes you most not only monitor the indoor temperature, but you must also monitor (and adjust) the Humidistat based on the FORECASTED outdoor conditions to maintain good IAQ!

    As the outdoor temperature drops, so does the temperature of the window/panes, so I posted a while ago X’s formula for indoor Relative Humidity vs. Outdoor Temperature if anyone want to look it up.
    The quality of my performance, sometimes depends on the quality of my audience.
    Imitation (Plagiarism) is the best compliment one can get -- "Open A Window"

    To improve Indoor Air Quality: Control Indoor Air QUANTITY = "I.A.Q.Q."

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    90
    Quote Originally Posted by Xavier View Post
    However, the question on an outdoor sensor is also misunderstood. My recommendation is DO NOT bother with one unless it is connected to the Weather Channel. The reason being it takes about a day for most tight homes to see a significant change in their indoor Relative Humidity; therefore, if you wait/rely on the outdoor sensor to turn it down, it is TOO LATE. This is why in today’s tight homes you most not only monitor the indoor temperature, but you must also monitor (and adjust) the Humidistat based on the FORECASTED outdoor conditions to maintain good IAQ!
    Great reply. Many thanks!

    But ... (I haven't had the opportunity to confirm this, yet) if the temp drops precipitously (it's been in the 70's, here, in Northern Colorado, but could conceivably drop by 50 degrees on any upcoming evening), then doesn't the heating output of the furnace fairly rapidly dry the indoor air OF a tightly sealed house??

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    724

    Smile How a Home really works!

    Quote Originally Posted by NBeener View Post
    Great reply. Many thanks! YOU ARE WELCOME!

    But ... (I haven't had the opportunity to confirm this, yet) if the temp drops precipitously (it's been in the 70's, here, in Northern Colorado, but could conceivably drop by 50 degrees on any upcoming evening), then doesn't the heating output of the furnace fairly rapidly dry the indoor air OF a tightly sealed house??
    NBeener In my HUMBLE opinion there are many misunderstandings of how a home works on this site that are not corrected. However, it would take a lot of postings to correct/explain them all. Nevertheless, you have stated one of them.

    Raising the temperature of air does not “dry it out”; remove water form the air. What changes is its “Relative Humidity”! What actually cause a house to “Dry Out” are air changes with the outdoor (“Relative Dry”) winter air.

    I have explained this several times using a balloon as your house. If you cannot find it, send me a note.

    So in conclusion, control the number of air exchanges with the outdoors and you can significantly improve the Indoor Air Quality of your home both Winter and Summer AND lower your HVAC costs. This is how I am able to condition my 3,500 sq ft of living space with only a 48,000 BTU furnace and cool it with only a 2 ton AC System!
    The quality of my performance, sometimes depends on the quality of my audience.
    Imitation (Plagiarism) is the best compliment one can get -- "Open A Window"

    To improve Indoor Air Quality: Control Indoor Air QUANTITY = "I.A.Q.Q."

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,171
    Quote Originally Posted by Xavier View Post

    However, the question on an outdoor sensor is also misunderstood. My recommendation is DO NOT bother with one unless it is connected to the Weather Channel. The reason being it takes about a day for most tight homes to see a significant change in their indoor Relative Humidity; therefore, if you wait/rely on the outdoor sensor to turn it down, it is TOO LATE. This is why in today’s tight homes you most not only monitor the indoor temperature, but you must also monitor (and adjust) the Humidistat based on the FORECASTED outdoor conditions to maintain good IAQ!
    Then your running less then a .2 ACH.
    Which is too low for good IAQ.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event