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  1. #1
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    So here's an old topic revisited,

    Where are you finding your quality people for apprenticeship or direct hire into your service / installation force and MORE importantly what are you doing to acquire these individuals? (I'm looking for some outside the box thinkers).

    Not looking for Sunday School answers. Where (really) are you looking and what are your results?

    Thanks in advance,

    Irish
    Everyone has a purpose in life..........even if it's to be a bad example.

    Seek first to understand, before seeking to be understood.

  2. #2
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    Good luck Irish...like finding a needle in a haystack.
    Now the freaks are on television, the freaks are in the movies. And its no longer the sideshow, its the whole show. The colorful circus and the clowns and the elephants, for all intents and purposes, are gone, and were dealing only with the freaks. - Jonathan Winters

  3. #3
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    Thread Starter
    Cool, I am looking for some honest, straightforward dialogue. We commiserate here on a regular basis about the dilemma associated with the ever decreasing interest displayed by the next generation in regard to a career in the trades. What is anyone else out there doing to promote the fact that someone with the skill set and determination necessary to succeed can and will have a rewarding (financially) career in the trades (specifically HVAC) and will have that gainful employment for as long as they choose. I am honestly interested in how all of us are going about finding individuals to supplement our work force. Do we just cross our fingers and hope that we snag someone who leaves a competitor, are we actively partnering with VoTech Schools and apprenticeship programs, or are we just pressing on, hoping and wishing that we can continue to meet the demands of our schedules? Why are we making this a 'needle in the haystack' or were you referring to the lack of interest from our peers in sharing ideas that may be fruitful?

    All the best,

    Irish
    Everyone has a purpose in life..........even if it's to be a bad example.

    Seek first to understand, before seeking to be understood.

  4. #4
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    Thread Starter
    I find it ironic that directly adjacent to my thread is a post inquiring to others about working overseas. What is WRONG with this picture? Why can't or better yet, why WON'T we keep these techs stateside? Going overseas to work in our profession should not even be a consideration. What have we allowed to become of our industry when techs seriously consider this option? Hard to be critical of those who send jobs and industry overseas, when our own techs give consideration to working likewise.

    All the best,

    Irish
    Everyone has a purpose in life..........even if it's to be a bad example.

    Seek first to understand, before seeking to be understood.

  5. #5
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    We have a good relationship with the local tech school instructor. He used to be the service manager at the company I work for. We participate in the advisory committee for the tech school program and donate used or broken equipment at times. The owner of the company makes an effort to attract the top students who get a good recommendation from the instructor. It's worked out pretty well, but sometimes being good in school doesn't equate to being good in the field.

  6. #6
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    I think it starts with how an employer treats its current employees.

    Not just payscale but work enviroment, job security, training, etc.

    Its a 2 way street, if you want the best empoyees, be the best employer and trust me, they will find YOU.

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  8. #7
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    The removal of vocational training from high schools was a mistake IMO. Somehow a 4 year college degree was pushed on all American students...not sure how or why that happened. I do know that it has been detrimental to all the trades though.
    The good thing is that we are going to see a revival of HS vocational training and apprenticeships very soon. This will make it much easier for companies to form/mold/create a good tradesmen for their company.

    When I was in HS, I was getting credits for working at a local store. They were business credits, and every once in a while, my teacher would stop in and talk to my boss.

    Soon, America will have a new generation of Plumbers, Welders, Mechanical and Electrical workers. We will no longer have to contract with foreign countries to rebuild our infrastructure.
    Now the freaks are on television, the freaks are in the movies. And its no longer the sideshow, its the whole show. The colorful circus and the clowns and the elephants, for all intents and purposes, are gone, and were dealing only with the freaks. - Jonathan Winters

  9. #8
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    Here in the St. Louis area what was once out top notch trade school is graduating students who cannot read or write.
    Most of the schools in the area are only looking at their bottom line.
    I believe the unions need to do a better job of recruiting and training Grabbing theses kids just out high school for example.

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  11. #9
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    For the last year, I've been offering to pay for their basic trade school coursework...when not in class I've got them working on jobs/service calls with my more seasoned guys. They agree to pay back the cost of of the classes if they quit working for me within 2 years--prorated. I get plenty of smart young folks applying with this kind of program, so I'm a bit picky about who I hire into these spots--so far it's been working pretty well. Nobody comes out of trade school knowing how to do this job, but it shows me they're more committed to the career.
    Quote Originally Posted by Irishmist View Post
    Where are you finding your quality people for apprenticeship or direct hire into your service / installation force and MORE importantly what are you doing to acquire these individuals? (I'm looking for some outside the box thinkers).

    Not looking for Sunday School answers. Where (really) are you looking and what are your results?

    Thanks in advance,

    Irish

  12. Likes servicefitter liked this post
  13. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Irishmist View Post
    I find it ironic that directly adjacent to my thread is a post inquiring to others about working overseas. What is WRONG with this picture? Why can't or better yet, why WON'T we keep these techs stateside? Going overseas to work in our profession should not even be a consideration. What have we allowed to become of our industry when techs seriously consider this option? Hard to be critical of those who send jobs and industry overseas, when our own techs give consideration to working likewise.

    All the best,

    Irish

    I am going to assume you are asking a serious question. So, I will give you ther serious answer.

    Overseas work is a dangerous adventure that offers the lure of over 80k a year with no US taxes, and smaller taxes above the threshold for taxation, along with meals, a room, and and a 12 by 7 work week, with two trips home a year.

    In three years, you have enough to buy a nice home for cash, or enough to open your own shop.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist
    Member, IAEI

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  14. #11
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    My service manager has 6 kids from 29 down to 13. The kids plant the seed in the brightest kids, not going to College, that they may want to look into HVAC and invite them to meet us and a few techs to learn about the trade. About 50% of the kids we meet with are interested in joining us. Of that about 60% succeed in the trade. Don't know what I'm going to do once all his kids graduate High School. The biggest problem we have is that our biggest competitor for these kids are the local Cable companies that are offering 23-25/hr right out of school.

  15. #12
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    I know a strictly commercial plan & spec company that gets a lot of installers from what here in Tx is referred to as the "Cofield Tech School" which is a division of the prison system. But like I said its all commercial new construction or replacement but I still don't know how some of these guys can set foot on some jobs such as a school retrofit. I wouldn't have hired these guys when I was operational but thats me.

  16. #13
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    Retail Ready Career Center pumps out some good quality Techs!!! The majority of the graduates are military veterans as well! I would love to speak with you about our school and graduates.

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