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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wi
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    Help me build the outline for my new course

    I am creating an online video course that is designed to teach brand new people the basics they need to be a new technician.

    I would like your thoughts on what I am missing from the course, should expand on, or should eliminate. Feel free to ask any clarifying questions.

    You can see the mind map for the course below.

    WEEK 1


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    WEEK 2


    Name:  Week 2.PNG
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    WEEK 3


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    WEEK 4


    Name:  Week 4.PNG
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    USA
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    2,860
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    Just a brief look at week 1, I think its optimistic to cover that ground within a week and do it justice. Brand new guys hit with all that will not likely be around for following weeks.

    Guys that already have week 1 concepts, should be able to handle the rest. From what I see with current techs, IT would be in later weeks and alone would be more than a day to cover your outline. Know I couldn't cover more than just basic networking in a day and have all eyeballs still open and lights on.
    Propagating the formula. http://www.noagendashow.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
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    18
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    I second Orion242's comments about week 1.
    Personally, I would leave out the sections concerning the refrigeration cycle and psychrometrics. The are important topics, but more info than an entry-level EMCS tech needs. My first 2 years in the trade all I knew about DX was fan, compressor and reversing valve. It was only later that I started learning mechanical HVAC to combat the finger pointing. I think it's much more important for an EMCS tech to understand the big picture and how the various systems fit together.

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  5. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    335
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    Yeah, for someone new I think week one could be 2, maybe 3 weeks by itself.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    934
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    yes more like a 6 month plan
    Keep it simple to keep it cool!

  7. #6
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Bay Area California
    Posts
    12,389
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    It took nine months eight hours a day to cover that at the school I went to.

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  9. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    234
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    Some suggested topics:
    -How to replace a fully functional controller of brand A with brand B because my company doesn't carry brand A, so I don't t have the tool to fix the programming.
    -How to fix mechanical issues with controls.
    -Strength and endurance training for standing/sitting on ladders and buckets.
    -Which tools to forgetfully leave in the office/truck vs. bringing with you to the site.

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  11. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    California
    Posts
    456
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    Quote Originally Posted by philzito View Post
    I am creating an online video course that is designed to teach brand new people the basics they need to be a new technician.

    I would like your thoughts on what I am missing from the course, should expand on, or should eliminate. Feel free to ask any clarifying questions.

    You can see the mind map for the course below.

    WEEK 1


    Name:  Week 1.PNG
Views: 211
Size:  31.9 KB

    WEEK 2


    Name:  Week 2.PNG
Views: 208
Size:  25.1 KB

    WEEK 3


    Name:  Week 3.PNG
Views: 205
Size:  26.2 KB

    WEEK 4


    Name:  Week 4.PNG
Views: 208
Size:  21.4 KB

    All that in a few weeks? Put a guy in the field for 6 months as a helper and then start with the basics. If he's a keeper, he'll ask for what he doesn't know.

  12. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    18
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    Quote Originally Posted by asdf;ljk View Post
    Some suggested topics:
    -How to replace a fully functional controller of brand A with brand B because my company doesn't carry brand A, so I don't t have the tool to fix the programming.
    -How to fix mechanical issues with controls.
    -Strength and endurance training for standing/sitting on ladders and buckets.
    -Which tools to forgetfully leave in the office/truck vs. bringing with you to the site.
    Don't forget how to find your company cell phone after you left it in a panel in the ceiling because you were using it as a flashlight!

  13. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    171
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    Quote Originally Posted by masonlc View Post
    Don't forget how to find your company cell phone after you left it in a panel in the ceiling because you were using it as a flashlight!
    I think if you always leave a sacrificial cheap screwdriver from a distributor in the ceiling when you get on the job for the ceiling tile gods, then you are going to be OK and not lose the important stuff or drop flashlights down walls.

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  15. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Austin, TX
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    1,337
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    Yeah, I agree with the rest on time, even Tridium would turn that into a 20 week program.

    But you are doing these as videos so I am hoping you mean video creation time is 4 weeks or play time is 4 weeks and the videos are for the guys to learn after hours or certain amount each quarter.

    However, you make all those videos and let me sample a few I might talk to you about purchasing a bunch of them.


    I am guessing things like Ethernet MAC addresses, BACnet MAC addresses, BAUD rates, BACnet forms of communication(BBMD, Ethernet, IP) and when to use them, Device Instances, retry rates, PID loops, and so on are sub-topics of various already noted subjects.

    I might add:

    Lead/Lag systems
    common network types and how they work BACnet, Modbus, LON, N2, so on
    Enthalpy
    PC Security
    The Dreadful: To Firmware update or not to Firmware update (On a Friday? No no no no no and hell no!)
    RS-232, RS-485, RJ-11, RJ-45, Serial to USB Converters
    Diagnosing the network - cut in half, Oscilloscopes, Digital monitors, repeaters, and so on
    Software diagnostics and how to bench test your goods

    and a very important lesson "How to Train Yourself - the art of finding and integrating knowledge and how to determine its professional value or validity"
    If you're too "open" minded, your brains will fall out.
    Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

  16. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    934
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    I have a buddy going to school now for PLC on his last year now , and plans on entering into our side. he has zero hvac knowledge besides what I have explained to him so far , what he does have is some background with java html and syntax type languages , and decent IT knowledge , I think he is going to do fine after 1 year entry level job. I found this video below found it quite good and informative for a new tech https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=klggop60vlM stan

    this channel also has 2 other videos explaining chiller plant and 1 looking at entire picture
    Keep it simple to keep it cool!

  17. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Several Miles from Sane
    Posts
    1,637
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    philzito,
    Since you posted it in the Controls Section I am guessing you are referring to a "Basic" Controls Technician.
    That, Sir, is a very ambitious outline. I agree with most of the other comments.

    I would add, to your week 1 items (which will probably take 4 weeks min. to cover all that info) 2 things:
    1. Basic Math skills. Needed for electrical, Flow, etc. concepts.
    2. Basic Physics. Needed in Pressure, Temperature, Humidity, heat transfer concepts.

    I wish you all luck in the world. Please post a link when you get some of this finalized. I think you may be doing the industry a service if you put it together right.

    I hope you are going to put a reasonable price tag on your endeavor, don't give it away but keep it affordable so the people that may be interested can "Test the waters" without spending a fortune and then find out it's not their cup of tea.
    If sense were so common everyone would have it !

    Any advice provided is worth exactly what you paid for it, not a penny more not, a penny less !!

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