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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    392

    See-thru gas fireplace suggestions

    I have a customer that wants to install a see-thru DV or B-vent fireplace. The twist is that it will be mounted in a bedroom and will pass through an exterior wall to a deck on the second floor that just happens to be 100 feet from the Atlantic ocean.

    I am thinking about the Heat & Glo Twilight II. Anyone have any other suggestions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,056

    Exclamation Twilight II

    Rob, I am intimately familiar with that unit and I must caution you about a few things:
    You must really plan ahead on how you can weave the various layers of house wrap and weather resistant sheathing over the noncombustible board as presribed. This thing vents right out the top up against the exterior wall so you must have all the right things in all the right places.

    This unit has been rated as 'fenestration' so is legal in most places for use through an outside wall. That doesn't always make it a great idea. You are creating a hole in the thermal envelope of the home, which can make for a cold interior room whether at standby or even when burning. You cannot use just any old Fp unless it has been rated as 'fenestration'.

    Personally, I would be nervous about salt air around it. While it has a lot of stainless steel in it. There are a few pieces and fasteners that are not SS.

    Functionally, it works fine. If you install it to the instructions, you should have no problems as far as fire, water penetration or cold air infiltration. Just read the manual numerous times, know what building materials are being used and in what sequence and plan, plan, plan.

    Personally, I would recommend one indoor unit and one outdoor unit not attached to the building but right on the beach, ANY exposed fireplace is going to be a problem:
    a) keeping it working properly in the breeze
    b) keeping the thing from burning down. Outdoor fireplaces are Not tested with strong breezes against them. Therefore, the heat signature can change drastically causing adjacent combustibles to run much hotter than designed.

    If you try to incorporate all non-comb. materials around it, you run into problems keeping out water and air. A complex problem.

    HTH,

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    392
    Thanks Hearthman !!!! I have read the installation manual and, yes, it is quite intimidating to say the least. This project will not happen until the warmer months, so I have a lot of "education" time.

    Since you are "intimately" familiar with that unit, I could use a good helper on this job. :-) ........and it has been a couple of years since you have smelled the wonderful Virginia Beach salty air.

    Seriously, thanks for the info on this and thank you for everything you do for the hearth industry.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    1,383
    I have seen properly installed gas fireplaces that were susceptible to having the pilot blown out when installed in places exposed to severe weather or winds. I'm thinking of condo units multiple stories up in the air subjected to winds that aren't mitigated by other buildings, trees and such. Similarly, houses built on bluffs exposed to unobstructed winds sweeping up along the hillsides.

    I understand that fireplaces are tested for exposure to winds. But my experience is that such testing may not be adequate for unobstructed winds of the kinds described, and that might apply to ordinary houses exposed to winds off a beach.

    For a long time my theory was that such problems had to be defects in some parts or installation --- bad magnets or whatever. But after exhaustive testings and parts changing, the problems would often remain, and sometimes I'd actually SEE the pilot being blown out by a puff of wind.

    The remedy that tended to be a help in such situations was devising a wind shield to install around the pilot cut out of a can or from sheet metal. While Hearthman may frown on this addition to a fireplace, it was sometimes the only things that would help in such sitiations.

    I'd invite comments by others who might have noticed such problems.

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