Themostat location
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    54

    Themostat location

    Have a home with a 14' cathedral ceiling in the living room. Seems cold compared to the back of the house with 8' ceilings, which is to be expected. Currently the thermostat is located in the hall over the return close to the bedrooms, all that have 8' ceilings. Would it be wise to move themostat to living room area?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    south carolina
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    178
    i assume you have a wall of glass in your living room. have a company run a load on that room to determine if you have enough heat going to that room. maby adding a vent or increasing the size of the ones you have will remedy your problem
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
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    67,620
    That will tend to make the bedrooms that much warmer.

    Either run your fan 24/7, or install a ceiling fan to stop the straification in that room.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    717
    Quote Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
    That will tend to make the bedrooms that much warmer.

    Either run your fan 24/7, or install a ceiling fan to stop the straification in that room.
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    This " straification" ..is that anything to do with the "suppy" ?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Northeast Ohio
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    4,841
    In simple terms, when the system blower shuts off after a heat cycle, all of the warm air rises upward, hense the cold feeling in the "tall" room. The reason for running the system blower is to keep the air mixing to equal out the temp. The ceiling fan works as well by forcing the heated air back down into the occupied space. Either option will work.
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  6. #6
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    May 2007
    Location
    Naples, Fl
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
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    6,829
    The technical word for the problem you're experiencing is "system imbalance", meaning you have different temperatures in different rooms on the same zone. Relocating a thermostat to cure an imbalance problem is wasting time and money. You can accomplish the same thing by simply turning up the t-stat in its present location. Unless you make changes to the system, moving the thermostat won't change the amount of heated air going into each room during any given heat cycle. It'll just start sensing what happening in the new location and will over heat or under heat some other area that was previously comfortable.
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    54
    Thanks for all the advise

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