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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    6

    Northstar Heat-N-Glo Dilemma...

    I have and installed a heat-n-glow northstar and during construction, had the heat zone piping installed and run into basement.
    (now there is 2 pipe stubs awaiting hookup)
    What I intended to so (and still do) is have one pipe run into the intake plentum and the other pipe to the output plentum, and then, without the heat pump on, just run the blower and have it suck and push the air around the fireplace chamber, to get the most out of the fireplace....which would heat the house, no doubt.
    The problem is, per heat-n-glow technologies, which I just contacted, that this has not been tested because NFPA code 2-11 has not allowed this....hense, I'm probably screwed as far as doing this "legally".
    The only thing heat-n-glo approves and sell is a "zone Kit" which is basically a couple cheesey fans, ($200 ea.) that do the same thing as my furnace would do, but only direct the heated air in one or two different areas of the house, which is not want I want to do. My heat pump furnace is a new York and I do not have the model in mind.
    I need some heavey hitters here with any suggestions?
    Thank you

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,205

    Cool choices

    Sorry but you should have read all the literature on this fireplace. ALL fireplaces are zone heaters--period. The fact that some hybrid EPA rated fireplace heaters have the capability to direct heated air into adjacent zones is a plus but not a necessity. You should not be tapping anything into your existing ductwork that is not tested, approved or in vivo tested with that system. The air from this fireplace would be drawn into the return of your furnace regardless if the stove is firing or not. That would play hell on balancing your ducts and setting up your furnace for the optimum delta T and combustion efficiency. One minute, your stack temp is low the next it is high. Same for ESP.

    If you were told by a salesman you could tie this into your existing ductwork, then he mislead you and you may have recourse for a refund under the Implied Warranty of Fitness for a Particular Purpose. This is not the mfrs. fault but the seller or your failure to read the specs. and capabilities.

    Those 'cheesey' fans do move a lot of heated air but they move it into zones. You can play with your return ducts on your furnace to possible take better advantage of this additional heat the same as with any woodstove or other zone heater.

    As for the Northstar, if you decide to duct it the way you want to inspite of now knowing better, you will void the warranty and listing of not only the Northstar but also your furnace and could cause your homeowner's insurance to be cancelled. Should there be an unfriendly fire and someone got hurt, you could go to jail for gross negligence and reckless endangerment. Think about it. Either install and use the Northstar according to the listed instructions or return it.
    HTH,
    Hearthman

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by hearthman View Post
    Sorry but you should have read all the literature on this fireplace. ALL fireplaces are zone heaters--period. The fact that some hybrid EPA rated fireplace heaters have the capability to direct heated air into adjacent zones is a plus but not a necessity. You should not be tapping anything into your existing ductwork that is not tested, approved or in vivo tested with that system. The air from this fireplace would be drawn into the return of your furnace regardless if the stove is firing or not. That would play hell on balancing your ducts and setting up your furnace for the optimum delta T and combustion efficiency. One minute, your stack temp is low the next it is high. Same for ESP.

    If you were told by a salesman you could tie this into your existing ductwork, then he mislead you and you may have recourse for a refund under the Implied Warranty of Fitness for a Particular Purpose. This is not the mfrs. fault but the seller or your failure to read the specs. and capabilities.

    Those 'cheesey' fans do move a lot of heated air but they move it into zones. You can play with your return ducts on your furnace to possible take better advantage of this additional heat the same as with any woodstove or other zone heater.

    As for the Northstar, if you decide to duct it the way you want to inspite of now knowing better, you will void the warranty and listing of not only the Northstar but also your furnace and could cause your homeowner's insurance to be cancelled. Should there be an unfriendly fire and someone got hurt, you could go to jail for gross negligence and reckless endangerment. Think about it. Either install and use the Northstar according to the listed instructions or return it.
    HTH,
    Hearthman
    I actually knew exactly what I was getting. Plumbing to furnace was my idea. It's been installed (2 yrs) and is wonderfull. No, I will not be plumbing into my furnace for the obvious reasons. I will have to re-think this. A couple thoughts come to mind...
    1) use the recommended fan/fans to bring the f/p air, via in heats exchanger (the pipes that are stubbed out in basement) to a cold air return, and let the furnace draw it in, ff course without directly connecting it to furnace.
    This is basically what I'm doing now in the living room where f/p is located...it has vaulted ceiling with a big cold air return and I have the furnace fan set to recirc. which does every 20 min's or so for a few min's. I'm sure it pulls some heat in, but not much.
    2) since most of my house sits on the basement (2 kids rooms over crawl space) I should possibly just vent this heated air to the basement and let it warm up the hardwood floors up above. My furnace has a built in humidifier so it "should" be able to control the dry air.

    Other than this, I'm not exactly sure how to get the most bang for by buck.
    There is a lot of heat going to waste.
    What would you suggest? I do appreciate your help.
    Greg

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    1,078
    I'm wondering how you hooked the 6" B-Vent up to the unit without the heat zone kit. The kit comes with an adaptor which you NEED to hook up the unit correctly and also comes with the fan and housing.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by jtp10181 View Post
    I'm wondering how you hooked the 6" B-Vent up to the unit without the heat zone kit. The kit comes with an adaptor which you NEED to hook up the unit correctly and also comes with the fan and housing.
    installer had installed these particular units before and had the correct plumbing for it. just didn't finish project as I was not certain how/where I wanted to continue the run.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by drmax View Post
    installer had installed these particular units before and had the correct plumbing for it. just didn't finish project as I was not certain how/where I wanted to continue the run.
    I am facing the same issue, wondering what you ended up doing?

    Thanks

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by tommiesinc01 View Post
    I am facing the same issue, wondering what you ended up doing?

    Thanks
    explain a little more with what you're doing. is this area under constuction, as in, do you have access to the fireplace plumbing, or is it all finished?
    If finished and the plumbing was not installed while installation, then you're finished, unless you want to rip the wall apart. If your set up is exactly like mine, which you pretty much stated you were, with pipes stubbed to basement, well then I tried a couple different type fans to try to pull the hot air down, which did not work well. I did not run the stubs into my York furnace into the return air side, for didn't want to mess up the furnace. (there were some issues of having hot air going through the furnace, messing up sensors. What I am doing now, is just letting the hear off of f/p, go to ceiling and catch a cold air return, which my furnace fan cycles enough to spread the heat, fairly well. You have to keep in mind....if you do use any type of heat zone kit, or plumb into furnace, you'll be drawing off heat from the room in which the f/p is in. Kind of a toss up, as I see it now. I like what I got, just the way it is. Oh, and trying to pull heat "down", does not work worth a damn. Not sure how those jet pumps work that are sold with the heat kit, but they may sound like a vaccum cleaner, when running. Most likely a pain.
    If you're under new contruction, I'd make darn sure you have a cold air return in ceiling over f/p...good luck

  8. #8
    Thanks for your response. I am in the process of finishing my basement so I can pretty much do anything at this point. I will most likley add a return above the fireplace on the ceiling. I have had others suggest the same thing. The ideal situation would be to have the return suck the warm air from the box via the zone kit. Since multiple sites do not recomend this I better stick to what the experts say. Thanks again.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    6
    welp, i hope you had the pipes stubb'd to the basement. also, like i said before, drawing the air "down" does not work worth a damn, unless, the fan's that come with the kits, are extremely powerful. i am unsure and would want to check all this out, before going to all the trouble and expense of piping this thing out, to find out it does not work! perhaps there is a way for you to get hold of one of these fans from your dealer and temp. hook up to pipe, to see if it actually draws the air out and supplies heat.
    please let me know what you find out, as you're the only one i know of, that has something simular to my set up, and i have not finished out anything as of yet. here is my email address
    i'm curious to see what your set up looks like. thx
    Last edited by beenthere; 12-04-2009 at 11:01 AM. Reason: Removed email address

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,171
    No email addresses allowed in post.
    Put them in your profile, Thank you.
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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
    No email addresses allowed in post.
    Put them in your profile, Thank you.
    sorry 'bout that.

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