Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Desuperheater

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    10

    Desuperheater

    Has anyone had any experience hooking up a desuperheater to a conventional heat pump and can verify the efficiency and performance. I can see how great they work on a geothermal but is it worth the install time and cost to be attached to a conventional system.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    PA/DE area
    Posts
    1,535
    York made one along time ago,our FLA members should be able to help on this.
    It's NOT the BRAND,it's the company that installs it!!!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    out in the country
    Posts
    633
    A desuperheater would need to be tied in to the refrigerant circuit on the compressor discharge line, This is normally outside on a conventional heatpump. This would mean that you would have water lines exposed outside, if you live in an area the see outdoor winter temps at or below freezing you will freeze your water lines. However at one time Carrier and possible some other manufactures built triple split heatpumps that the compressor was installed inside the conditioned structure. These units were also possible canidates for desuperheaters. I haven't seen one (a triple split) in years, I'm not sure if they are still manufactured. Groundsource heatpumps are indoor units that is why they are an option on them.

    I have seen one desuperheater installed on a conventional heat pump. It was in the winter, it was froze and busted.
    I never let schooling interfere with my education... Mark Twain

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Memphis TN USA
    Posts
    6,945
    I have seen several. They were all inside. The discharge line was run to the desuperheater then back to the condensor.

    On mine, I have the compressor inside. Like the old Carrier tri-split systems. Problem with a desuperheater: my utility company charges a minimum for gas. The water heater saving can be eaten up by minimum charges sometimes.
    If the superheat ain't right it ain't charged right.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Southeast Michigan
    Posts
    54
    Quote Originally Posted by red73 View Post
    Has anyone had any experience hooking up a desuperheater to a conventional heat pump and can verify the efficiency and performance. I can see how great they work on a geothermal but is it worth the install time and cost to be attached to a conventional system.
    Do the manufacturer's even offer a desuperheater to attach to their units? If not, wouldn't a 3rd party attachment void the warranty?

    I haven't got an A/C system in my house yet and have been hoping for a MFR to offer this option on a heat pump which wasn't a ground source.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    706

    wouldn't an E.C.U.

    Isn't an E.C.U. ( hot water recovery unit ) a de-super heater as well. Uses the discharge gas to heat water for the household. Had one in my last house & it was great. I was able to turn off my (electric) hot water heater for 10 months out of the year.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,360
    Quote Originally Posted by red73 View Post
    Has anyone had any experience hooking up a desuperheater to a conventional heat pump and can verify the efficiency and performance. I can see how great they work on a geothermal but is it worth the install time and cost to be attached to a conventional system.
    I hooked up a desuperheater to my heat pump many years ago. Heated water very good. Not enough a/c hours in the Mid-west to make it pay. Better in the south. Most a/c mfgrs. void warranty if desuperheater connected. Regards TB
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    10
    I am in south Arkansas and this where I primarily do my business. The ones I have looked at states that you can place the Desuperheater a maximum of 15 feet from the condensor. I talked to my Lennox rep and his take on the warranty was don't ask, don't tell.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    Not that they couldn't void the warranty,never had it happen.Carrier even had knock-outs in the cabinet to run the copper to and from the the Heat Recovery Unit(ECU/Desuperheaters).

    Used to be thousands installed,even a sales tax credit for the enitre HVAC system,if an HRU was included,plus part of the energy code ,here if Florida.

    Not many being installed today,as high SEER equipment,doesn't have the waste heat to make them worthwhile.

    With 10 SEER and down,you could turn of your water heater,May to October.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Southeast Michigan
    Posts
    54
    Makes ya wonder if it's just better to get a desuperheater and a lower efficiency A/C...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Memphis TN USA
    Posts
    6,945
    The trick with a desuperheater: don't condense freon. Even a freon mist travelling at high speeds is like sand blasting.
    If the superheat ain't right it ain't charged right.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event