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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Dallas,Texas
    Posts
    52

    Cool how to check freon leaks

    My unit seems to have a leak and two weeks ago, a tech came in and recharged without telling where it leaks.. He simply told he wouldn't know and asked me if I want it charged. It was hot day and I had to have a cool house because of my baby. He guessed it was leaking from condensor unit because surchage cap was oily.

    Since then it worked and today, my unit does not seem to work at all. Outside fan blows cool air instead of warm and I don't see any condensation on outside unit. Lucky, cold front came in.

    I plan to call another tech or maybe the same tech and ask what's going on. However, I doubt if the tech from the same company will find anything and wanted to know if there is anything I need to ask them to do to find the leaks.

    I also plan to replace my outside unit and got some quotes to replace. My evaporate coil is only 4 years and all techs told I should just keep them since it's relatively new. However, can the evaporate coil be leaking as well? and does a tech have a way to detect a leak?.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    I don't know
    Posts
    2,904
    Did he check the filter, blower, and evaporator coil for dirt prior to checking the charge? Did he measure the indoor wetbulb temperature? What about the suction/liquid line temperature? (outdoor?)

    If the answer to any of those questions is no, you need to find another service company.

    Leaks can be found with the use of an electronic leak detector or a soap solution. Sometimes there is no leak; low (suction) pressure can be caused by insufficient airflow.

    My evaporate coil is only 4 years and all techs told I should just keep them since it's relatively new. However, can the evaporate coil be leaking as well? and does a tech have a way to detect a leak?.
    You can keep it, provided that it can be matched with a new 13 SEER outdoor unit. (They don't make 10-12 SEER units any more) The metering device may need to be replaced if it's not a TXV. Yes, the leak could be in the evap coil or lineset.
    General public's attitude towards our energy predicament: "I reject the reality of finite resource depletion and substitute it with my own; energy is infinite, we just need an alternative storage medium to run the cars on. The economy can grow indefinitely - we just need to "green" everything! Technology is energy! Peak what?"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Dallas,Texas
    Posts
    52
    no,

    I don't think the tech didn't check anything except for some pressure check for freon. He didn't bother go to attic until I asked hime to check.

    Okay,......I have tried two techs so far this year and turned out pretty bad ..I guess I will try my luck again.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    491
    Quote Originally Posted by noltian View Post
    no,

    I don't think the tech didn't check anything except for some pressure check for freon. He didn't bother go to attic until I asked hime to check.

    Okay,......I have tried two techs so far this year and turned out pretty bad ..I guess I will try my luck again.
    if you don't feel you'll get anywhere with the most recent tech and are going to have a different company come out, do some research before just calling the next company you see in the phone book. ask friends, neighbors, co-workers about any recommendations they may have. when you find out who you're going to call, tell them briefly the history on your system and ask if the tech they'll be sending out will have the training, the tools and the time to accurately diagnose your systems needs.

    * i wouldn't mention that you have plans to replace the condensing unit though. i'd just let them look at the whole system and make their recommendations based on what they know it needs.

    * ask questions. it is our job to help you. helping you means answering your questions and educating you (to a degree) about what you need and why.


    .

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    11,874
    It can take as little as fifteen minutes, or four hours to find a leak(s). All time that you pay for. Seems to me, if you call, and ask them to find a leak, they should be able to find it. Yes, an evaporator coil can start leaking, a week after installation. If you're shopping price alone, then you can expect the results you've gotten so far. There's a couple of contractors from your area that visit this board, you might want to contact one of them.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Ft.Worth,Tx
    Posts
    4,584

    Post

    Leaks can be in a number of places:

    evaporator coils/welds
    line set
    connections
    service valves
    TEV/flowrater
    condenser coils
    compressor terminals
    tube sheets
    cap tubes
    pump down valves
    schrader cores

    Better to have leak search done by a professional ..
    "Everyday above ground, is a good day".
    "But everyday that you have made a difference in someones life, may insure you stay above ground a little longer".<aircooled>

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    South,Tx
    Posts
    331
    when you get whoever you get "be specific as you can" to look and find the "Leak" , and then maybe you will see some action taken place.
    Matt 7:12 The Golden Rule
    "Do for others what you would like them to do for you. This summary of all is taught in the law and the prophets.

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