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Thread: this trade

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    6

    this trade

    hey guys, my son is turning 18 in may and asked me to help him to get into my union,local 475.
    i've been in the buissness since 1983 and feel my age and don't see a future for old men. let me hear your thoughts on this and how many second generation guys are there out there.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    7,326
    As a second generation steamfitter, I too am feeling my age a bit, but still find my career path likeable. I was one of those kids who scored very well throughout my schooling, had scholarships to go for academics, but just didn't feel it. Scored over 1300 on Sat's back in the day. I decided to give ownership a try, and find it very challenging and rewarding. I still like to go out and play with the tools though even though I do not have to. There is just something about actually building something. I don't know what it is. Started in 86. I worked a ton of industrial before moving into commercial in the mid nineties. For me, doing larger stuff was always fun. We did up to 1000 hp boilers, 3000 ton chillers and the like. It was commonplace for us to be installing pipe up to forty eight inch. We once ran condenser lines underground for something like forty miles going to the nuke. I kinda miss those days.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    ATL
    Posts
    56
    This is a no brainer I am sure your payscale is good if he starts now he will be at jorneymens pay that much faster in his life while his friends are working jobs in a carier they won't be in 5 to 10 years from now and as we all know this NOT a boreing feild and you never stop learning .GET HIM IN the kid is asking you for help be proud and do it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Sterling Heights, MI
    Posts
    143
    Go for it! Don't miss the opportunity to help your son if you can. My dad worked in the refrigeration trade. He showed me what it was like at a young age, and when you are the kid who wants to be just like dad, and it becomes a fire in you, let it burn! I did, and know how proud he was of what I had become. I am sure you are proud that he even thought of doing what you do. So many find their children are not at all interested in what dad did, and that is the problem this industry has today with the shortage of tradesmen in HVAC-R.
    Better Service Through Knowledge...
    RSES, The HVACR Training Authority. www.rses.org

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Southern, CA
    Posts
    520
    If the interest is really his, why even ask the question? Help if you can. Does he like to tear stuff apart, build things, work on his car, bike, boat, skateboard, whatever? If so he'll probably like A/C too. I had the privilege of working with a third generation tech when I first started, very sharp fella. Thinking about it now I wonder if that made his grandfather an ice block deliveryman? I've also worked with a second generation who I think got into it cause having dad in it made it easy. And wouldn't try to figure anything out, just leave if he didn't already know how to fix it. Either way at least he'll be able to feed himself. If you can, have him ride with you for as long as he wants to. It's the best way I can think of for him to see if it's something he'll like.

  6. #6
    Wow, I'm impressed with yalls answers. i don't have anything near that, but I might add, when I was 18 my dad told me to be employeed in a trade, because I would always have a job. so I did. So if he goes for it, he'll always have a job, let him know. the economy doesnt look good now, might be a great opportunity to pass that along...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Shelby Twp MI
    Posts
    820
    I say get him in if you can. If he doesn't like it, then let him know that you understand if it's not his cup of tea. I'm fifth generation, and I'm running a job that my dad is on. Sometimes he runs the jobs, sometimes I do, but we enjoy working together, and work very well with one another. It helped me see him in a better light, knowing what he's been dealing with all these years. One bad thing about the trade though is the toll it takes on you, at least where I work. Since we do plant work, our metal is heavy. Most all our duct is 16 ga or heavier, and my daily hammer is a 3lb drilling hammer. Let him know the good and the bad of the trades and help him any way you can.
    Jim

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Orange Park Florida
    Posts
    224
    I know HVAC and Pipe trades .This would not have been even remotely possible for me outside of the union. U.A. training is second to none!!
    Local 234
    Have Gauge$ Will Travel

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Rockhill South Carolina
    Posts
    370
    my dad owned a small heavy equipment shop in florida when I was a kid and thats what I wanted to do but I guess the ac buisness is close enough.personally If I were you I would be very proud of him wanting to follow in your footsteps.AS for myself I have a young daughter who is not 2 yet but scares me with her little mechanical brain,not shure what I would think if she wanted to do this for a living.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    arlington, tx
    Posts
    225
    i started working for my dads company when i was 16 i quit pharmacy school to help him out and i think i made the right decision im 23 i have multiple cars motorcycles and a house and i already have more tools than 95% of 40 year old guys not to mention that my friend that stayed in pharm school will graduate 200000 dollars in debt after student loans

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    11,347

    *

    Quote Originally Posted by mechanicalgsxr View Post
    i started working for my dads company when i was 16 i quit pharmacy school to help him out and i think i made the right decision im 23 i have multiple cars motorcycles and a house and i already have more tools than 95% of 40 year old guys not to mention that my friend that stayed in pharm school will graduate 200000 dollars in debt after student loans
    let me guess, you have a GSXR

    i sold my busa last year, i need another on!



    .

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    arlington, tx
    Posts
    225
    Quote Originally Posted by Airmechanical View Post
    let me guess, you have a GSXR

    i sold my busa last year, i need another on!



    .
    ya 2007 gsxr1000

    the stupid thing is governed at 186 mph whats the point of that!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    11,347

    *

    Quote Originally Posted by mechanicalgsxr View Post
    ya 2007 gsxr1000, the stupid thing is governed at 186 mph whats the point of that!
    they sell a TRE (timing retard eliminator) that disables the governor!



    .

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