Heatpump comfort - Page 2
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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    East central Indiana
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    477
    A while ago, I installed an electric furnace for an old guy. He was convinced that the blower was moving so fast that it was somehow "quenching" the heat of the furnace. He actually opened up the compartment containing the elements to show us that the coils weren't bright red like they were "supposed" to be. He constantly di@#ed with the thermostat trying to get hotter air.

    Guy drove me absolutely insane. I am always scared to install equipment for old people.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
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    67,694
    Quote Originally Posted by ECIndHVAC View Post
    If it feels so cool to them standing over the registers, then why don't they just...you know...not stand over the registers???
    Its not just standing over the register.

    The air may be moving toward them from the register 10' away. And they will notice it isn't as warm as the gas furnace was.
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  3. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    East central Indiana
    Posts
    477
    Very well then.

    So what do you tell customers about HP comfort? That the air will be a bit colder, but the house will heat up, and do so much more cost effectively?

    I'm convinced that the best way to deal with some of those old foggies out there is to rig up a 200,000 btu furnace with a ton and a half blower and hope the a$$holes die before the heat exchanger fails.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Lincoln, Nebraska
    Posts
    1,051
    Its all in how you educate your customers. And were not all old fogies by the way. I like dealing with older customers.

    The way I explain heat pump on a estimate is as follows. Your body temperature is 98.6 (normal). If they are the kind of people that like comming into the house on a cold day and standing on a register to warm up then a heat pump will more often than not feel like it is just blowing air or the air conditioner is on. Say a furnace puts out 120 air and the heat pump on any given day is putting our 95 air. It will make the room comfortable but not be moving hot air. I always tell this to the older folks as they are prone to notice these temperature changes more than a younger person.

    This way they know what to expect from a heat pump over there furnace. Let them make the call as to what they want. I also show them the savings they can get with a heat pump.
    Its a good Life!

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Westchester Co, NY
    Posts
    104
    It sounds like its a very subtle heat that will maintain the home at the required Temp. In this day and age with well insulated homes - or at least in my project - this should be fine. I will also have a wood stove - which is where i Like to park my A#$ when its snowing out!!

    Is there need for humidity control - read - is it like the Dry heat from a furnace or more like Hydro air (If this is even a feasible comparision)

    Thanks for everyone's input - thank god I am not yet an old foggie...

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
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    67,694
    Explain to the customers, that the air temp will be cooler then their old oil or gas furnace if they are in its air path. But will still heat the house for less.

    If, they show signs that they are not comfortable with that.
    Then recomend they stay with oil or gas heat.

    You should sell your customer what they need. And that will not always be what is the most economical to operate.

    Their comfort, is out living.
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  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
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    67,694
    Air discharge temp has no bearing on room humidity.

    The discharge air of a HP will read a higher RH, but will contain the same amount of actual moisture.

    If a house has high infiltration, you will still need a humidifier.
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  8. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Lincoln, Nebraska
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    Around here it seems about want or need a humidifier and about get by without. The heat pump dosn't burn up your moisture. It depends on your back-up heat and how often it will be used. Also depends on house construction, infiltration.
    Its a good Life!

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Westchester Co, NY
    Posts
    104
    Guys - thank V much for the commentary. I appreciate the help in making the decision

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    The Twilight Zone
    Posts
    2,964
    Quote Originally Posted by doogan123 View Post
    It sounds like its a very subtle heat that will maintain the home at the required Temp. In this day and age with well insulated homes - or at least in my project - this should be fine. I will also have a wood stove - which is where i Like to park my A#$ when its snowing out!!

    Is there need for humidity control - read - is it like the Dry heat from a furnace or more like Hydro air (If this is even a feasible comparision)

    Thanks for everyone's input - thank god I am not yet an old foggie...
    The woodstove increases the number of air exchanges between the house and the outdoors which reduces the humidity inside the home (unless there is an external air supply pipe for the woodstove).

    I have the same problem in the winter when I run my masonry fireplace w/insert. The house is so dry that I have cracking between the bottom of some drywall and the cove molding.

    I will be installing a by-pass humidifier in the heat pump air handler this winter. This should also allow me to knock a degree off the setpoint temp since the more humid air will feel warmer.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Dallas & Longview, TX
    Posts
    629
    Let the pros give their take on it but I believe the CFM flow is more critical in a heat pump vs. a furnace because you don't want the "cool" 95* or so draft blowing on you. A VS blower can dial down the airflow so you don't feel the draft. On a standard furnace at say 120* the warm air at a higher CFM may be more acceptable to some.

    Alot of registers I've seen (ceiling) have the air stream blowing towards the center of the room vs. draping the walls/windows with the conditioned air. This should be addressed also along with the register type for greater diffusion as Been noted earlier.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Atlanta area
    Posts
    47
    Quote Originally Posted by Daltex View Post
    ... Alot of registers I've seen (ceiling) have the air stream blowing towards the center of the room vs. draping the walls/windows with the conditioned air. This should be addressed also along with the register type for greater diffusion as Been noted earlier.
    At my folk's house, this is exactly the case upstairs. They have a heat pump that serves just the upstairs. It's located in the attic. Ceiling registers. Doesn't matter if it's summer and cooling, or winter and heating, there's too much airflow and always feels like the air coming out is too cold. In my uneducated opinion the thing is also sized too big; it seems to short-cycle also. A double-whammy.

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Westchester Co, NY
    Posts
    104
    As I call around my neighbourhood getting more information on HP's, I had a conversation with a distributer today (Primairly oil/gas) who while was not against them, indicated that in the cold months you need backup (Which i was educated on by you guys) but also in the hot humid summer months - that a Heat pump typpically cannot keep up with the cooling load. Given my limited knowledge of these, I cannot say that this is accurate or not - however I find it hard to believe. Can anyone comment?

    Thanks again

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