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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Mesquite Tx.
    Posts
    361
    It's fairly easy to do, on a larger system you can just leave one end of the tubing open while purging. On a residential condense change out, remove the schader cores, connect a hose to the regulater an set it so very little nitrogen is coming out (you don't want to pressurize the lines too much or it will be hard to braze) connect it to one of your lines and wait a few minuites for the system to purge, make sure you have flow exiting the open scrader, and begin to braze. Leave flow while the lines cool. When done use nitrogen and trace gas to leak check. Replace scrader valve cores. Leak check ok, purge nitogen out, vacuum to desired level and open valves on unit. At least you have not introduced any contaminants to system. Added time on this job 10, mins.

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    1,232
    I find it too bad that so many of the new techs are not properly instructed as to how to perform such simple tasks as nitro purging, evacuating and using a micron gauge, let alone how to charge correctly or size/check duct work. Quite often it is because they are being taught by "old timers" that still do things the OLD way and so it just perpetuates down hill from there. We offer classes on a regular basis but the ones that should be attending usually don't. Of course they also use the instruction manuals for knee pads. Glad I will be retiring in a few more years.

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NW burbs of Detroit
    Posts
    6,058
    I use dry processed CO2. The aluminium tank is lighter.

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    128
    CO2 is not Inert and will not stop oxidation.

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    107
    Quote Originally Posted by Vortech View Post
    CO2 is not Inert and will not stop oxidation.
    I agree. There's a lot of oxygen (O2) in CO2.

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NW burbs of Detroit
    Posts
    6,058
    Gee maybe I better stop using it then......

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Mesquite Tx.
    Posts
    361
    I see a lot of people using CO2 instead of nitrogen, I have wondered if CO2 absorbs moisture as well as nitrogen. Most jobs spec nitrogen. I agree you get a lot more CO2 in a tank, but if it is not as good as nitrogen with moisture, then I would stick with nitrogen. Although for drains, doesn't matter.

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Dallas, Tx.
    Posts
    572
    Quote Originally Posted by adamk View Post
    > Then it means that in 16 years he never read the installation instructions...

    So true...

    I guess the HVAC companies don't practice continuing education. This is the next thing to ask for when getting quotes for new systems...

    Adam
    it all depends on the company
    mike

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Twin Cities Minnesota
    Posts
    181
    The "cleaning" property's of R410A are so much better than say R22,. Been told by Reps. if you cut lines open down the road,there crystal clean! You know where it went?

  10. #36
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    330
    A flow meter inline after the nitrogen regulator makes the right flow easier to obtain/maintain.

    Set regulator no higher than 10psi and flow meter to about 2-5LPM after purging. You'll get more mileage out of a tank.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    JUST A LITTLE CLOSER AND THE LITTER BOX IS ALL MINE!

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