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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,793

    the house that styrofoam built

    any of you ever worked on a house built out of ICF's? This is the first one I've ever seen.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
    Posts
    21,752
    Would present a few interesting issues to do a load calc...

    A few years ago, I did a rebuild of a system on a home that was insulated with Icynene (spray in foam). The house had all 2x6 ext walls, and 2x12 roof rafters; they were all filled with foam. There were a few issues find values to do a load calc from, but some folks posted references here.

    From looking at the job at the beginning, it appeared the RNC contractor was in over his head... lots of issues in the ductwork and zoning that needed to be straightened out.

    It turned out well, the customer is happy!
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Quality work at a fair price with excellent customer service!

    Romans Ch's 5-6-7-8

    2 Chronicles 7:14

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,793
    This particular house is pier and beam with no attic space and I dont see where any consideration was made for HVAC, maybe they will use ductless.I could see the potential for disaster for sure

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Naples, Fla.
    Posts
    1,403
    I've done a few -- let me give you a heads-up.

    The BTU that a typical load generates is proportional to the cfm, so you have enough air moving in the home for "creature comfort". When you do the load on the Styrofoam home you'll end up w/ 2200 sq ft @ 2 tons of capacity, so you can see the dilemma is air distribution.

    I'd recommend you BUILD a system that bypasses air on the evap to meet your typical range of cfm while allowing the right cfm thru the coil for BTU load. Also - PLEASE add in fresh air.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,793
    I didnt know what to expect as far as load per square foot is concerned but I've heard that the typical 400 cfm per ton is definately out the door....lol!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,642
    Several up scale builders in SW FL have gone spray foam on all their homes. The include fresh, make-up air ventilation via whole house dhumidifiers. Work very well. BCB builders is one of many. Regards TB
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Lucas, TX
    Posts
    107
    Where is this house located ? It would be interesting to see.

    Adam

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    garland, texas
    Posts
    680
    Is that on Mockingbird Lane in Highland Park?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,793
    I don't want to infringe on anyone's right to privacy by revealing exact details (there could be legal ramifications, I'm not sure). I would be glad to correspond via email if you'd like to discuss it.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Houston Tx
    Posts
    344
    I built my home with ICF and Iceneye 3084 sq ft 3 tons cooling 20 miles from galveston texas.. works perfect Air flow is the issue i have ERV but find that i dont need it for fresh air the doors opening and closing works well

    and I just went thru Hurricane IKE and suffered no damage

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Lititz, PA (Lit' itz) not ( Li' titz)
    Posts
    122
    Just like the others said you end up about .6cfm per sq ft. which is low on average. Good on energy consumption. I suggest that you will need zoning or seperate units on each floor. you would not get enough air flow to the second floor, pending designs. Also you will need to put in a fresh air exchanger. When your done they will have a great economic system, and all your hair will be gone from pulling it out. Good luck with the design!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,793
    Quote Originally Posted by slice View Post
    I built my home with ICF and Iceneye 3084 sq ft 3 tons cooling 20 miles from galveston texas.. works perfect Air flow is the issue i have ERV but find that i dont need it for fresh air the doors opening and closing works well

    and I just went thru Hurricane IKE and suffered no damage

    Congratulations! Its good to hear some good news from down that way

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,642
    Quote Originally Posted by slice View Post
    I built my home with ICF and Iceneye 3084 sq ft 3 tons cooling 20 miles from galveston texas.. works perfect Air flow is the issue i have ERV but find that i dont need it for fresh air the doors opening and closing works well

    and I just went thru Hurricane IKE and suffered no damage
    How much fresh air do you get into your home? How do judge that you are getting enough? For years, I also thought I did not need any mechanical fresh air until I measured the air change rate. I found I was getting as low as an air change in 24 hours from natural infiltration and fans/clothes drier. This was during calm, warm weather. Some of isolated areas of the home tested very high CO2 levels. American Medical, EPA, AHRAE suggest an air change in 3-4 hours. I changed to providing 60 cfm of fresh air ( 14 hours per day), when the home is occupied plus natural ventilation. The 60 cfm amounts to only an air change in 10 hours plus natural infiltration/exhaust fans. This well below recommendations. After adding the 60 cfm of make-up air, my whole family reports a big improvement in the comfort/feel of the home. I agree. Build-up of volitile organic coumponds are difficult to detect because they are odorless. Just curious. Regards TB
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

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