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Thread: hvac license

  1. #53
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    Mar 2005
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    Houston, Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
    You mean you not going to let him drive around all day, depositing the hundreds of checks people give and mail to you. LOL
    If he can talk my wife into it he can. So, I'll have to say negative to that request.

  2. #54
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    Mar 2008
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    Shelby Twp MI
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    Quote Originally Posted by ECIndHVAC View Post
    For those of you out there who may be scratching your heads in confusion, I shall attempt a translation:

    "Classical, we're in a situation where we should just agree to disagree. But I'm not going to agree to that, and therefore, I will continue to argue. I say that it's OK if I become a hack contractor who rips people off, because anyone stupid enough to hire me deserves to be taken advantage of. But I would never be a hack contractor, because I take pride in what I do. In fact, I am such a genius that I am frequently missunderstood. For example, my foreman either mistook my greatness for incompetence, or was just jealous of me, and so he gave me a hard time. I was too brilliant to have to put up with his nonsense, so I just quit. However, management realized what potential I had, so they begged me to return and reprimanded my foreman for his idiocy. Under normal circumstances, I wouldn't have returned to my position as a tire rethreader, but since management deemed me worthy of a seven figure salary, I reluctantly accepted.

    Current research leads me to believe that good work leads to good recommendations. I also suspect that if you do good work, then it may well be the case that you do good work. I hope this overblown chain of nonsense makes good sense to you folks. I do not want to pay for an HVAC education, but I would like to pay for an HVAC education. I want to become licensed, but I don't want to become licensed, because I'm only interested in HVAC for my own repairs. Purple monkey dishwasher.

    In closing, I would like to admit that I'll never reach consumate professional status as a tire rethreader, because the technology is changing too rapidly. But you, Classical, have a chance.

    Godspeed, amigo"


    Hope this helps.
    That's funny right there. I for one want to thank you for the laugh.
    I'm not bashing (anymore) but that's hilarious, and I thought it lightened things up a bit.
    Jim

  3. #55
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    May 2008
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    43
    lol. i would love to walk before i could crawl, but mother nature would not allow me to do so. if and when i do succeed on the license etc. i am most definitely not going to hire helpers right away that takes time. i would have to supervise for a good while till i can fully trust my helpers to be left alone, not only that make sure they aren't thief's and cause me more grief than good.

    if i do succeed in getting my license and the dangling wrangler would hire me as a helper for a while im all for it. i wont mind it at all, yes he will make profit but in return i can learn from a professional that has bin doing so for a while.

  4. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by junior1 View Post
    lol. i would love to walk before i could crawl, but mother nature would not allow me to do so. if and when i do succeed on the license etc. i am most definitely not going to hire helpers right away that takes time. i would have to supervise for a good while till i can fully trust my helpers to be left alone, not only that make sure they aren't thief's and cause me more grief than good.

    if i do succeed in getting my license and the dangling wrangler would hire me as a helper for a while im all for it. i wont mind it at all, yes he will make profit but in return i can learn from a professional that has bin doing so for a while.
    You don't have to have a contractors license to be a helper but, I think you have to register with the state for a lower form of license. If I'm not mistaken, that's a relatively new rule (within the last five or so years?) I'll check that out tomorrow.

  5. #57
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    Feb 2006
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    Tn.
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    Quote Originally Posted by classical View Post
    Adamsmasher read this again and then think about your last post; it was his attitude and lack of respect for what we do that got under my skin. Well that and his poor langauge skills.
    I can't take somebody seriously that writes like a 3rd grader.I agree

  6. #58
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    May 2008
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    i understand that you don't have to have a license to be a helper. i would still get my license just to have to be able to become a contractor down the road. i would love to be under a professional as a helper to see exactly how it should be done. i want to see the right way of doing things before i jump in on it on my own. i wouldn't mind being a helper for a year or so to get the feel for it. i am not scared of being in the attic at all. like i said i was all over the helper in my attic sweating my ass off. the contractor came at 1:30 pm to bring his helper food but i had already beat him to that. his helper had already eat a good meal at noon (wife cooked dinner for us) the contractor was like you are in the attic too why is my helper doing something wrong. i said no i like to see what im paying for and don't mind helping him out. i was thinking to my self im actually learning in the process. that being said i am just wanting to learn the correct way of doing things right. i will hit you up when i get my license, right now its just words out of my mouth.

  7. #59
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    Mar 2005
    Location
    Houston, Texas
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    When I got my license you had to have at least three years hands on, or three(or more) school years experience, and three state licensed contractors sign off for you if you wanted to get the state license. Someone correct me if I'm wrong. The city might be different, if they still issue a city license. It's been a long time since I have even looked at what it takes today. Would I do it again? Probably not. Not knowing what I know now. There's easier, cleaner ways to put bread on the table. I've lived comfortably but, as far as being "rich" Not monetarily but, in other ways, yes.

  8. #60
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    May 2008
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    i understand every word you are saying. i still have lots to learn on this trade/profession all with time.

  9. #61
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    Feb 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by junior1 View Post
    i understand every word you are saying. i still have lots to learn on this trade/profession all with time.
    Yes,
    Like dragging all your gear up a suicide ladder along with a 5 ton compressor and not to mention sweating your b@lls off on a 125F roof. Its not fun and sometimes i wished i would have went to school for something else as its not all gravy especially alone.

  10. #62
    Like dragging all your gear up a suicide ladder along with a 5 ton compressor
    I carry a chain-fall and a few heavy duty rope block n tackle setups. The other day I changed out a 15hp cast iron blower motor in a penthouse mechanical room. Used the chain-fall and furniture moving dolly, made the job easy. As long as I can find something to tie off to I'm in good shape. I also built myself a little frame I can set over a condenser so I can lift compressors out with the chain-fall. I'm not into heavy lifting

    As far as the license, I went to trade school then worked in the field for 5 years before getting a license and going on my own. God I love being my own boss

  11. #63
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    Feb 2006
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    Phoenix,AZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeepSouth View Post
    I carry a chain-fall and a few heavy duty rope block n tackle setups. The other day I changed out a 15hp cast iron blower motor in a penthouse mechanical room. Used the chain-fall and furniture moving dolly, made the job easy. As long as I can find something to tie off to I'm in good shape. I also built myself a little frame I can set over a condenser so I can lift compressors out with the chain-fall. I'm not into heavy lifting

    As far as the license, I went to trade school then worked in the field for 5 years before getting a license and going on my own. God I love being my own boss
    Ya whatever,
    Your still dragging a bunch of stuff around.

  12. #64
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    Houston, Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeepSouth View Post
    God I love being my own boss
    The newness will, and does go away over time. It did for me anyway.

  13. #65
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    Sep 2008
    Location
    Lafayette, IN
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    95
    Originally Posted by junior1:
    i have an mvac license which is considered a 609 i believe which im going for a 608. soon it will be in my hands all with time.
    Your mvac is not a license, neither is your Section 608. They are just certifications. I don't think you and these other guys are talking about the same thing. You need a lot more than clean air act certification to even come close to being even just a technician, let alone a contractor.

    I have an Associates of Applied Sciences in Manufacturing & Industrial Technologies with a concentration in HVAC, gone to several seminars and in-house classes, I have over 2 years experience, I've put in countless of hours of crawling through attics and crawlspaces, purchased thousands of dollars in tools, and I'm still considered a novice. I still don't make much money (just enough to buy more tools). I still get the grunt jobs and probably will for a long time to come.

    If you are looking for quick and easy money, play the lottery. If you're looking for challenging, rewarding, and interesting work; go to school, earn your stripes crawling eyeball deep through blown insulation every day, and eat sleep and breath HVAC for the next 5 years or so. Then, maybe, maybe, if you have the guts and determination will you become a technician.

    Most people don't make it that far. I agree with the dangling wrangler Probably more than eighty percent of the people who start off in this trade drop out. About forty to eighty kids graduate from the college here in my town every year and I don't see any of guys I went to school with in the wholesale houses. I don't see any new people at all for that matter. And those that do stay in the business know that it isn't like they expected when they started. It's not the way I expected it to be anyway.

    As far as getting a "licence" just to work on your own equipment; you'll probably only learn enough to get yourself in trouble. Besides the cost of the tools you'll need far outweighs the cost of hiring a tech.
    Last edited by j0joe33; 09-13-2008 at 07:55 PM.

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