Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1

    TRANE model# TUE100A948K2: motor upgrade

    We have been happy with our Trane indoor Forced Air furnace with model # TUE100A948K2, except that the upstairs is never as cool as the downstairs, and when it finally gets cooler upstairs, the downstairs feels too cold. We are therefore thinking of upgrading the motor to push the cold air more quickly upstairs. Is this a good move? Which upgrade would you recommend? Any specific model of a motor you could recommend?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    11,347

    *

    Quote Originally Posted by ksr View Post
    We have been happy with our Trane indoor Forced Air furnace with model # TUE100A948K2, except that the upstairs is never as cool as the downstairs, and when it finally gets cooler upstairs, the downstairs feels too cold. We are therefore thinking of upgrading the motor to push the cold air more quickly upstairs. Is this a good move? Which upgrade would you recommend? Any specific model of a motor you could recommend?
    if your thinking about putting a bigger motor than the unit is designed for, then it's a bad move!

    sounds like you have a distribution problem!

    heat travels up, it's gonna be hotter upstairs in the summer "as well as the winter"

    you may want to consider zoning your duct system to fix that problem if other methods don't work!



    .

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    79
    colder air is more dense and will fall to the lowest level. Do you run the furnace blower in the fan ON position that can help some with thermal-cline between floors.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    131
    quote:if your thinking about putting a bigger motor than the unit is designed for, then it's a bad move!
    I had to change a 1/2 hp to a 3/4 hp motor on a 3.5 ton to get the correct fpm. The mfg had spec'd a 1/2 hp motor. FPM went from 430 to 680. Of corse I checked the temp rise and the external static as well as the amp draw on the motor. All good
    Last edited by pipefitter636; 08-30-2008 at 11:11 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    68,776
    If you put in a bigger motor to push air upstairs faster. It will also push air to the first floor faster.

    You have a distribution/balancing problem, not caused by the blower motor.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    131
    The 1st floor wasn't getting enough air either. A 1940's 2 story house.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    68,776
    Quote Originally Posted by pipefitter636 View Post
    The 1st floor wasn't getting enough air either. A 1940's 2 story house.
    I was talking to the OP.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Quote Originally Posted by pipefitter636 View Post
    quote:if your thinking about putting a bigger motor than the unit is designed for, then it's a bad move!
    I had to change a 1/2 hp to a 3/4 hp motor on a 3.5 ton to get the correct fpm. The mfg had spec'd a 1/2 hp motor. FPM went from 430 to 680. Of corse I checked the temp rise and the external static as well as the amp draw on the motor. All good
    Way to confuse the thread with your solution to a different kind of problem than was being asked about.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    131
    Sorry Didn't mean to try to confuse the thread.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    327
    Hot Rises, cold air falls, simple as that. You need to be able to ballance the airflow accordingly to send more heat downstairs in the winter and more cold air upstairs in the summer.

    Automated zone controls are by far the best solution - you get the right temperature at the right place at the right time. If you can't afford zoning, however, you can install adjustable dampers to seperate the upstairs ductwork from the downstairs ductwork. For example, you might need 60 up 40 down in the summer amd 60 down 40 up in the winter.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Round Rock
    Posts
    3,652
    Putting a bigger motor to push more air faster upstairs. That is ridiculous and a complete waste of money for a new motor. I hope somebody that does this a living didn't suggest that too you. If so, tell them where to go. I guess it will magically not push the air to the bottom floor just as fast? There is no simple fix for this, it will cost $$$ and take time.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event