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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    24

    Confused Preparing a commercial bid-help!

    I am needing some advice on preparing a commercial bid. We are just getting into this commercial stuff and have never really done one of these. We are used to just a single page estimate. When we turned one in, we discovered we did not have near the information that they wanted. They showed us a complete binder that another company had turned in and gave us a second chance to complete it. Does anyone have any advice as to how and what content needs to be included or maybe have a sample of one you have done that I can look at? Need help fast! I would greatly appreciate someones help!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    1,582
    Sometimes there is a formal bid request with forms including a bid form. Sometimes there is nothing said and you do whatever you feel is correct.

    I would take the opportuity to talk to them now. Just because the other guys turned in a binder does not mean you have to. I'd start sellling right now by asking questions. Like if we make our bid look just like this do we have the job. Or if we can't put this together will we not get the job?

    It could be they just need your bid to look like the others to tell the boss they got two bids, both about the same, and they'd go with the other guy. Finding out if that is the case is going to save you a lot of time.

    I've sold chiller overhauls that required tha same kind of binder and then 1./2 million dollar jobs on a one page quote sheet you'd use for a compressor changeout.

    They want your paper work for soemthing. Either they need another bid or your number is good and they need your bid cleaned up to award it to you. Try to find out which it is.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    7,321
    Typically I use a basic word document that spells out scope of work, what is included, and what is not included. I very rarely do anything that could be considered a binder, unless we are talking about a design build type project and then that would include equipment and control submittals etc. As stated speak with them, and find out what they are looking for. Most of my bids are one or two pages for projcets that might approach up to a mill.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    24
    Here is the crazy thing. This is only a 5 ton job for the railroad. Only 5 tons!! I mean I could not even imagine what they would want on a 5 ton. They wanted spec sheets for the metal ducts, units, everything I was going to use on the job. So I was just wondering if this was standard for the commercial business?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    1,582
    The main thing is to talk to them not the paperwork. Maybe they want the other company to do the job at your price and they just need to prove to the other guys you included X and X. Try to get them to commit to giving you the job if you send them the paperwork.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    ATL
    Posts
    56
    this a gov. bid.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Metro ATL
    Posts
    454
    Has an engineer done the specs or is this design build?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    24
    No it isn't a gov. bid. Yes a engineer has done the work on it. I am thinking that our numbers looked good like Pneuma said, because he took our "informal" bid with him to the meeting and he said we could fix it right after they meet. I guess he wanted to show them the numbers??? I don't know, I guess well see. We didn't have very long to prepare the proposal and did not have the spec book with any information in it. So I don't know how he expected us to do it like they wanted?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    SW Florida
    Posts
    1,260
    What they are asking for is a process called "submittals". It is very common. Put together "cut sheets" on all your equipment and commonly used materials and parts into a "master binder". Then you will have them for the next time. Your submittal for the bid will then go to an engineer for approval where he will stamp them approved or rejected. Dont substitute without approval.

    Be careful.. I have been in commercial construction for a long time and am still finding and learning every day. It is not for the timid

    You should fill out your profile and apply for pro membership and post inquiries like this in the pro forum

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    24
    Yes,
    That is what I am working on. I think you have to have at least 30 posts or something.

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