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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    26

    New guy questions

    I've posted here a couple times...I've been working for an upper Midwest company for four months now and I'm really enjoying it and glad I made a career change. Used to be a truck driver. I graduated top of my class at tech school and consider myself fairly intelligent. But some things that happen on the job blow me away. I don't like to ask too many "dumb" questions of my more experienced co-workers, so I will ask them here. It seems our biggest abortion is a reopened Denny's. All brand new equipment from the make tables to the walk in freezer and cooler. We have had A) bad TEV on walk in cooler. B) heaters on drawers on freezer the manufacturer "forgot" to wire. C) GFI on egg cooler constantly trips. D) door switch on reach in freezer doesn't press in far enough, so evap fans never came on. E) walk in cooler door doesn't shut. F) electricians wired the defrost heaters wrong on both walk ins...What the hell? Is this stuff just junk? It's all brand new! Is this what I have to face the rest of my life?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    26
    And that's just the callbacks I have been on. Several other tech's have gone back as well.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    381
    Experience will teach you what to look for and fix at install / start up in order to prevent these types of call backs. But yes, this is what you have to look forward to!

    When its second nature to prevent these messes, you will be on your way to becoming a tech. Stay with it and learn from these calls!

    Sent from my ADR6350 using Tapatalk 2

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    26
    Oh, they are filed away in the brain housing group for sure...just bums me out that a customer orders all brand new stuff and it has this many issues. Maybe this is the norm.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    54
    Cswenson, you're already thinking like a successful tech as you care or act like you care about the well being of your customers financial standing as it correlates to their successful bill payments. That being said these mistakes or hack work were not your fault and probably the fly by night guys who will low bid a quote written by another company but end up charging more in extras. Now you are there and take this as a blessing in disguise as this is your time to shine and learn. The work can be billed I assume too. Every one learns in the end except the installers who overworked and lacking training are already starting the remodel down the street that your company didn't get cause the bid was too high. In the short term and service oriented business may not be as profitable but it will surpass installation only businesses as time passes and repairs are proved out.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Western KY
    Posts
    1,221
    Welcome to the jungle. As pointed out you situation most likely a result of "low bid wins" business. I don't like it either but I have a philosophy about such things. Pay me now or pay me later. Later costs more!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,548
    Quote Originally Posted by dsprice View Post
    Experience will teach you what to look for and fix at install / start up in order to prevent these types of call backs. But yes, this is what you have to look forward to!

    When its second nature to prevent these messes, you will be on your way to becoming a tech. Stay with it and learn from these calls!

    Sent from my ADR6350 using Tapatalk 2

    dsprice makes an excellent point.

    When a piece of equipment is installed, particularly a built-up piece of equipment, it should be started, tested and commissioned by an experienced technician.

    There are a lot of steps in this, but it will eliminate a lot of the 'stupid' calls during the first weeks and months after it is started.

    A good start-up guy makes the company money on warranty.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    54
    Quote Originally Posted by jpsmith1cm View Post
    dsprice makes an excellent point.

    When a piece of equipment is installed, particularly a built-up piece of equipment, it should be started, tested and commissioned by an experienced technician.

    There are a lot of steps in this, but it will eliminate a lot of the 'stupid' calls during the first weeks and months after it is started.

    A good start-up guy makes the company money on warranty.
    Jpsmith, warranty work can really be a tough thing to profit on IMO. The manufacturer's stiff you on your allotted time for labor generally, you gotta have a person who follows through on saving warranty parts and not letting them get tossed in the dumpster, and if don't dot all your eyes and cross your T's the manufacturer won't accept sometimes etc. If he didn't do the install then he shouldn't have to deal with all that time consuming BS. I mean I wouldn't turn down work at reputable business and the owner may know and understand that parts are still under warranty. I just wouldn't go looking for warranty work around here anyways because they can treat you like dogs and you gotta depend on employees following through with paperwork and shipping to make a profit. I guess I'm asking your experiences as we all have our niches in the industry.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,548
    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman7997 View Post

    Jpsmith, warranty work can really be a tough thing to profit on IMO. The manufacturer's stiff you on your allotted time for labor generally, you gotta have a person who follows through on saving warranty parts and not letting them get tossed in the dumpster, and if don't dot all your eyes and cross your T's the manufacturer won't accept sometimes etc. If he didn't do the install then he shouldn't have to deal with all that time consuming BS. I mean I wouldn't turn down work at reputable business and the owner may know and understand that parts are still under warranty. I just wouldn't go looking for warranty work around here anyways because they can treat you like dogs and you gotta depend on employees following through with paperwork and shipping to make a profit. I guess I'm asking your experiences as we all have our niches in the industry.
    You missed my point entirely.

    You make money on the warranty by NOT having to do any warranty service calls with a proper start-up and commissioning.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    54
    Jpsmith, much apologies as I clearly interpreted your post bass ackwards and just reiterated the fact that warranty work is not a good thing. Does this mean I'm gonna be denied a problem membership. Hahaha jk, but I will recite my PT CHART ten times before I make another post. Hahaha

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    18,249
    You asked it it was junk. It might be. I find junk in every location of one particular restaurant I go into. We just added these stores because retail is on its butt.

    They bought cheap stuff, and then they decided they didn't want to maintain it. So, every one I go into has self contained reach-ins in the kitchen, with the condenser coils coated with grease. Today I had a Q DUAL that looked like it was never cleaned. The ice probe easily completed the circuit to ground through the coating of slime, sending the machine into harvest before any real ice could form. POS.

    Yes, restaurant work is a cost slashing affair, and this is what you can expect.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

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