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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    6,285

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    6,285
    Quote Originally Posted by nchvac View Post
    I am not so sure. I will have to go back and verify, but I am pretty sure that this device was located on the line feeding the outdoor TXV, which will definetely be a liquid line, not a suction. I looked at this pretty hard as I traced the lines out, but I will go back.

    That was an interesting report. I am suprised to learn that refrigerant oil attracts refrigerant. I always thought that the refrigerant was attracted by the lower temps. I think that this is still true, but evidently the oil has some type of phenominon going on with the coolness that attracts the refrigerant. Otherwise, using a crankcase heater would not benefit much if the refrigerant was attracted merely to the oil, and not the cooler temps. Does this sound correct? Is this theory what you took out of that part of the report? Please advise. Thanks
    http://www.fileden.com/files/2008/6/...escription.pdf

  3. #16
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Jax Fl.
    Posts
    1,943
    Quote Originally Posted by nchvac View Post
    I am not so sure. I will have to go back and verify, but I am pretty sure that this device was located on the line feeding the outdoor TXV, which will definitely be a liquid line, not a suction. I looked at this pretty hard as I traced the lines out, but I will go back.

    That was an interesting report. I am surprised to learn that refrigerant oil attracts refrigerant. I always thought that the refrigerant was attracted by the lower temps. I think that this is still true, but evidently the oil has some type of phenomenon going on with the coolness that attracts the refrigerant. Otherwise, using a crankcase heater would not benefit much if the refrigerant was attracted merely to the oil, and not the cooler temps. Does this sound correct? Is this theory what you took out of that part of the report? Please advise. Thanks
    The difference in surface tension attracts the refrigerant to be absorbed into the oil. The process will continue until the is a pure band of liquid refrigerant lying under the oil [since it weighs more]. This is where the oil pump inlet screen is located. Starting the compressor pumps the liquid refrigerant to the bearings, removing any oil film, adhering the aluminum rods to the crankshaft.

    Using crankcase heat drives the refrigerant out of the oil to condense somewhere cooler.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,137
    Ok guys, this unit is a Trane XE 1000. It it model number TWR018C100A4. mANUFACTURED IN 08/2002.
    Here is how this thing is mounted. The liquid line comes into the unit. The liquid line T's off to a part resembling a factory line dryer (1' diameter x about 5 inches long), and then goes into the TXV. The other line off of the T goes to this Charge robber, which again resembles a field liquid line dryer, and then comes back into the line that comes out of the TXV just before the diffuser that branches off to the circuits.

    Does this ring a bell to anyone?

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    4,307
    In Trane WebCats its listed as a accumulator; Charge Robber ( part #ACC00085). I believe Big John got it correct.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    south bay california
    Posts
    132
    I know that on trane condensers, they utilize a ll drier before the txv that looks like a generic torpedo style copper drier, because the liq line travels in one direction and the suction the same, the use of a bi flow drier outside of these units is not needed.

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