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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,137

    Trane Charge Buster

    I worked on a small Trane Heat pump today that had a part that resembles a liquid line dryer on the liquid line inside of the unit before the TXV. It had the words Trane Charge Buster on it, and I am just wondering if this is indeed a liquid line dryer. Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    ottawa canada
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    2,012
    Nope Its an accumulator..

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Ohio
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    456
    Quote Originally Posted by graham View Post
    Nope Its an accumulator..
    If it's before the TXV, it wouldn't be an accumulator, but it could be a receiver.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    ottawa canada
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    2,012
    Yep your right its a reciever . shouldnt drink before posting ??????

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,137
    The accumulator would be on the suction line. I am not clear on this being a reciever because it if installed in a vertical position. It looks like a normal filter dryer in the vertical position. I am wondering what a reciever would be doing on a residential Trane unit. I thought that was big boy stuff. Thanks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    4,327
    If its before the reversing valve its a muffler, if its before the indoor TXV its a drier. Trane normally does not use accumulator because of the Climatuff compressor.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Arizona
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    4,327
    If you have a model# i'll check for you.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
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    5,137
    Quote Originally Posted by jimj View Post
    If you have a model# i'll check for you.
    I'll get it monday.

    Usually, the muffler is located on the hot gas discharge line right after the compressor to help control the compressor noise. I will check for the accumulator. I am pretty sure I saw one, but the unit was running and I was in a hurry.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    7,529
    Its a charge robber designed to steal away a little refrigerant during heating operation.

    I guess.....cause I dont know exactly what the OP is seeing

    But from the factg that he is seeing a trane label with "charge buster" on it...Im going to go ahead and ASSume its a charge robber.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,137
    Quote Originally Posted by corny View Post
    Its a charge robber designed to steal away a little refrigerant during heating operation.

    I guess.....cause I dont know exactly what the OP is seeing

    But from the factg that he is seeing a trane label with "charge buster" on it...Im going to go ahead and ASSume its a charge robber.
    Great, now I HAVE to go take that panel back off, because I think that you are right. It may have indeed said robber instead of buster. I assume that this device takes the place of an accumulator? Please advise as to how it works, because it just looks like a liquid line dryer to me. Thanks

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    6,285
    "6. Charge Compensator: The use of a charge compensator (low side receiver model PR 3083 manufactured by Parker Hannifin) in heat pump applications is another way of controlling refrigerant. This receiver mounts in the suction line coming from the outdoor coil to the reversing valve. Do not get this line confused with the common suction line from the reversing valve to the compressor where an accumulator is normally installed. During the heating mode, refrigerant is pulled into the receiver/compensator due to the low temperature of the suction line going through the device. During the heating mode, there can be a large percentage of the refrigerant charge backed up in the condenser (indoor coil in the heating mode). This backed up refrigerant can cause an increase in discharge pressure and a loss of heat output from the system. By storing this excess refrigerant in the low side receiver, the system would have better control of the refrigerant and the system efficiency would increase due to operating at a reduced high side pressure. Liquid return to the compressor during defrost could also be reduced, possibly eliminating the need for an accumulator. Prior to eliminating the accumulator, extensive system testing would be required to confirm all liquid surges (especially during defrost termination) have been reduced to a level that will not endanger the compressor."


    http://www.bristolcompressors.com/InfoDocs/Application%20Bulletin%20101.doc

    Does that sound like what it is?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Central CA
    Posts
    566
    Very interesting iv never seem them let alone heard of them.
    Makes sense though that reffer has to go somewhere during heat mode
    Thats why i love this place, always learning something

    Edit: tried to google it and only came up with one for lennox 222.00 list price gotta love it

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,137
    Quote Originally Posted by BigJon3475 View Post
    "6. Charge Compensator: The use of a charge compensator (low side receiver model PR 3083 manufactured by Parker Hannifin) in heat pump applications is another way of controlling refrigerant. This receiver mounts in the suction line coming from the outdoor coil to the reversing valve. Do not get this line confused with the common suction line from the reversing valve to the compressor where an accumulator is normally installed. During the heating mode, refrigerant is pulled into the receiver/compensator due to the low temperature of the suction line going through the device. During the heating mode, there can be a large percentage of the refrigerant charge backed up in the condenser (indoor coil in the heating mode). This backed up refrigerant can cause an increase in discharge pressure and a loss of heat output from the system. By storing this excess refrigerant in the low side receiver, the system would have better control of the refrigerant and the system efficiency would increase due to operating at a reduced high side pressure. Liquid return to the compressor during defrost could also be reduced, possibly eliminating the need for an accumulator. Prior to eliminating the accumulator, extensive system testing would be required to confirm all liquid surges (especially during defrost termination) have been reduced to a level that will not endanger the compressor."


    http://www.bristolcompressors.com/In...etin%20101.doc

    Does that sound like what it is?
    I am not so sure. I will have to go back and verify, but I am pretty sure that this device was located on the line feeding the outdoor TXV, which will definetely be a liquid line, not a suction. I looked at this pretty hard as I traced the lines out, but I will go back.

    That was an interesting report. I am suprised to learn that refrigerant oil attracts refrigerant. I always thought that the refrigerant was attracted by the lower temps. I think that this is still true, but evidently the oil has some type of phenominon going on with the coolness that attracts the refrigerant. Otherwise, using a crankcase heater would not benefit much if the refrigerant was attracted merely to the oil, and not the cooler temps. Does this sound correct? Is this theory what you took out of that part of the report? Please advise. Thanks

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