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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    6,285
    Quote Originally Posted by jamesfb View Post
    I am in Denver CO, and it has been very cool lately for August. In the 80's mostly, with a few low 90's.

    The building is literally brand new (15 stories), and the unit is new.

    The maintenance guy has removed the filter completely.

    None of the vents even close, and literally I think the longest duct can't be moire then 5 feet, yet I feet hardly any air when I hold my hand up to one of the vents, even with the blower on high.

    Have the check the fire dampner if the building is new and has no airflow even when on high.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NW burbs of Detroit
    Posts
    6,058
    These are idividual units itsounds like. I don't thinlk you need dampers unless the ducts penetrate the wall to another apartment unit.

    Correct me if I am wrong.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    6,285
    Quote Originally Posted by hvaclover View Post
    These are idividual units itsounds like. I don't thinlk you need dampers unless the ducts penetrate the wall to another apartment unit.

    Correct me if I am wrong.
    It was just another guess.....I really don't have a clue but in the buildings I have worked in with split systems they had dampers that shut because of a malfunction. I'm sure I'm wrong but it's worth looking at if he says there is no airflow.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NW burbs of Detroit
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    6,058
    If it is set up that way then yeah that is possible.

    It has been my experience with high rise buildings that new that the workers had to run the heat to dry wall the place.

    The fact the maintenance man pulled the filter in a "Brand new building"

    tells me the filter was jammed packed with dirt.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    5
    The unit is individual to the apartment. It is mounted in the ceiling, and blows through ducts into three rooms, the living ares, and two bed rooms. The ducts to the bed rooms have to be about 1 to 2 feet long each, and the one to the living area maybe 5 feet long. The access panel over the unit swings down and usually holds the filter. I have been in the apartment 10 days and there was no filter in the unit when I moved in, I did request to have one put in the day I arrived. The maintenance guy (construction coordinator) said he would once they had it fixed, even to my objections.

    Thanks for all the feedback and ideas guys, I really appreciate your help! I should be able to formulate a good argument with him to get a professional to come and really work on the unit.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    294
    Quote Originally Posted by hvaclover View Post
    You'Re saying a dirty filter won't cause a motor o/l to trip open?

    I think you should explain that one.
    What I am saying is that most fan curves I have seen show a DECREASE in power at the same RPM when there is increased blockage of the ducting ,including increased resistance due to a dirty filter. In fact, if you totally block a system you will have MINIMUM power delivered by the blower .
    On the other hand if you have a flow controlled system where you have feedback control to hold the flowrrate constant then the opposite is true.
    The OP's system does not have this control.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    NE PA
    Posts
    698
    Quote Originally Posted by sskzekeman View Post
    What I am saying is that most fan curves I have seen show a DECREASE in power at the same RPM when there is increased blockage of the ducting ,including increased resistance due to a dirty filter.
    I also completely agree with this. Blowers that the HVAC industry uses, whether axial or radial, draw less HP when they do not deliver airflow. If you block the airflow in a canister vac, the motor speeds up. There are some blowers that will increase HP, but they are specialty industrial apps for high head or vacuum.

    It is either a bad design on the part of the mfg, or a bad (batch) of motors, or low voltage, or a bad cap or some combination of these. Also as was said, any HVAC motor is certainly rated for 100% duty cycle.

    paul

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,086
    Going by the OP, this sounds like a fan coil unit, running chilled water from a centralized chiller. If the apartment is not on a top floor or has a lot of glass/wall area exposed to the sun, it should stay pretty darn cool in there with a chilled water fan coil set on 68.

    Motor going out on overload...replacement motor possibly wired incorrectly, incorrect voltage, or run capacitor bad (brought over from original motor, maybe, or new one bad out of box).

    The on-site guy handed you a load. Those motors in those fan coils can run and run without overheating if they're wired and sized correctly.

    Weak airflow when the blower manages to run is why you're not getting your apartment down to 68. I'd put money on the cooling coil being plugged with drywall dust, as others have said. The original motor windings may have been plugged with dust as well, which is why it failed.

    Running the unit without a filter in it is just asking for trouble.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NW burbs of Detroit
    Posts
    6,058
    Quote Originally Posted by tecman View Post
    I also completely agree with this. Blowers that the HVAC industry uses, whether axial or radial, draw less HP when they do not deliver airflow. If you block the airflow in a canister vac, the motor speeds up. There are some blowers that will increase HP, but they are specialty industrial apps for high head or vacuum.

    It is either a bad design on the part of the mfg, or a bad (batch) of motors, or low voltage, or a bad cap or some combination of these. Also as was said, any HVAC motor is certainly rated for 100% duty cycle.

    paul
    This would be an air over blower. And it would over heat if a dierty filter were in place. But since OP said it was removed then that leaves a plugged coil which is the most likely circumstance since he has only been in th apt for ten days.

    The motor speeding up in a canister vac by blocking air flow also causes motor over heating.

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