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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    RIVERVIEW, FL
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    37

    using condensate water to help condence

    im just starting out in the field so tell me if this sounds stupid or not.. i was thinking about making somthing at my house that uses the condensate water from the evap to trickle down the condenser coil to help condence. due to home owner assoc. rules and laws i can not put any type of shade by my condenser from the florida sun. do you think it would help out at all?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    66,758
    Not really.
    A trickle wound be worth while.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Poestenkill, NY
    Posts
    769
    Any energy saved by the evaporation advantage would be out-weighed by the pumping energy of getting the water to the top of the unit. We're taliking miniscule amounts of energy either way here, I would think...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    NW AR
    Posts
    2,475
    Just for arguments sake, a better idea would be to use the condensate to further subcool your liquid line.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    RIVERVIEW, FL
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    37
    thats even a better idea .. thanks for the reply

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    66,758
    If a 3 ton system, has a condensate of 1 gallon an hour(8.33 pounds of water).
    And moves 6.6 pounds of refrigerant a minute. How much benefit do you think you will get.
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    1,634
    A better use for the AC condensate is to capture it and use it for irrigation. I have a french drain installed underneath the condensate drain pipe that redirects the water along my back garden. Ended up installing the french drain because the condensate had dug a nice 8" deep hole. Worked well last winter (dry season). You could easily tell where the french drain and condensate were. Nice green grass near the house.

    Whatever you do, keep an air gap between the existing drain pipe and new drainage. This is to keep bugs from crawling up the drain line and also keeps the system draining properly in case the add-on drain system backs up.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Las Vegas NV
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by ar_hvac_man View Post
    Just for arguments sake, a better idea would be to use the condensate to further subcool your liquid line.
    For arguments sake:

    What gain would there be in additional subcooling? Subcooling is sensible heat which should not have an effect on system pressures. The heat transfer takes place during condensation (latent heat). Any additional cooling efforts at this point (albeit miniscule in this example) would help in lowering the condensation temperature and effectively lowering the high side pressure. This would in effect decrease the load on the compressor resulting in higher efficiency. I would think that any attempts at increasing efficiency of dissipating heat would be best directed at the point of condensation, the coil.

    Thoughts?

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