Removing AC system
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  1. #1

    Removing AC system

    I am in the middle of renovating a house with a laundry list of problems, and I am in the process of removing the air handler and furnace in order to start working on some of the duct work.

    I called my AC service techs to come out, check the system, and remove the coolant so that I could disassemble and pull the system out. When they arrived they checked the suction and liquid lines and said that the system was already empty, probably due to a leak, and I didn't need to worry about it if I was junking the system (it is 25+ years old, so yes). I was there and checked the gauges myself and indeed both were showing 0 pressure.

    Today as I was removing the liquid line from the evaporator coil it was definitely pressurized, and managed to blow out a large amount of oil before I could get the line re-attached.

    Could this be explained by some normal issue, or do I need to call company #2 to come out and evacuate the system?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    USA
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    Valves shut on outdoor unit maybe. I am going to guess that you tried to unscrew the metering device and reattached it but if I am wrong than you must tell me how you reattached the line.
    Oh and yes get it evacuated properly.
    "It's always controls"

  3. #3

    hey

    the shrader valves might not be out enoff so wen u put the gages on it dosent register to to the gauges.now my kids 10 years from now are going to get a good tan because there is no ozone though.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
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    Zelienople, Pa
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    Probably an old condenser with king valves that weren't opened properly...
    How tall are you Private???!!!!

  5. #5
    I'm not sure if it was before or after the metering device, I couldn't find one. The liquid line connected just outside of the evaporator case with a flare nut; nothing else was in-line at least 4 feet prior to the case. Inside the case the line split into a series of capillary tubes and and ran directly to the coils, I couldn't see a crimp or any other type of restriction on the line.

    To reattach I just muscled the line back in and tightened the flare nut back. Approximately 1-2 quarts of oil came out before I could get it back in; I was pretty soaked (and unhappy) by the time it was said and done.

    I informed the tech that the system was being removed and the whole point of the visit was to evacuate the system, they are in the process now of pricing a replacement, but I'm a little skeptical of having them install a brand new system if they can't properly service an existing one.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snibblelo View Post
    I'm not sure if it was before or after the metering device, I couldn't find one. The liquid line connected just outside of the evaporator case with a flare nut; nothing else was in-line at least 4 feet prior to the case. Inside the case the line split into a series of capillary tubes and and ran directly to the coils, I couldn't see a crimp or any other type of restriction on the line.

    To reattach I just muscled the line back in and tightened the flare nut back. Approximately 1-2 quarts of oil came out before I could get it back in; I was pretty soaked (and unhappy) by the time it was said and done.

    I informed the tech that the system was being removed and the whole point of the visit was to evacuate the system, they are in the process now of pricing a replacement, but I'm a little skeptical of having them install a brand new system if they can't properly service an existing one.
    Things happen but yeah I would be skeptical too. I bet there is not much left in it now seeing as you got 1-2 quarts of oil out of it. I would make them finish the evac for FREE and possibly pay for your shirt.
    "It's always controls"

  7. #7
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    Oh yeah the liquid line right before the evap that would be the metering device connection.
    "It's always controls"

  8. #8
    Thanks for the quick replies, I"ll have company #2 come out a check the system to make sure it's empty and evacuated properly, it still had quite a bit of pressure left in it when I got it sealed again.

    Since I know there is pressure in the system now, if this company can actually service it correctly, they will probably end up with my new installation business as well.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snibblelo View Post
    Thanks for the quick replies, I"ll have company #2 come out a check the system to make sure it's empty and evacuated properly, it still had quite a bit of pressure left in it when I got it sealed again.

    Since I know there is pressure in the system now, if this company can actually service it correctly, they will probably end up with my new installation business as well.
    Good plan. Glad we could help. Good luck and remember proper installation is everything. Choose a good local reputable company. The money you save on hack will cost you double in the long run.
    "It's always controls"

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