Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    western Missouri
    Posts
    16

    Blower change from single to variable

    I have a Lennox gas furnace that's a couple of years old. Actually a propane furnace. Model G43UF. It has a blower that "ramps" up to speed.
    I have a Lennox HP13 heat pump that's a couple of years old. Run of the mill unit.
    I have a price for a ground source heat pump system. It's a lot of dollars. But I can't decide if it's worth it. I need to talk to the installer again about how he arrived at his break even point. And also if this other idea makes sense.
    Should I purchase a Lennox XP19 to replace my current HP13? I know that unit requires a variable speed blower and mine is not. Can that blower be changed to variable speed? I wonder if I would be better off going that route vs the ground source? Just trying to figure the most cost effective way to go here. If his calcs are correct he says that with the ground source that I could heat and cool my 4000+ sqft house for $881 a year and have the hot water savings.
    Thanks to all,
    Troy

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    4H: Hot, Humid Houston H.O.
    Posts
    3,304
    Quote Originally Posted by TSully980 View Post
    I have a Lennox gas furnace that's a couple of years old. Actually a propane furnace. Model G43UF. It has a blower that "ramps" up to speed.
    I have a Lennox HP13 heat pump that's a couple of years old. Run of the mill unit.
    I have a price for a ground source heat pump system. It's a lot of dollars. But I can't decide if it's worth it. I need to talk to the installer again about how he arrived at his break even point. And also if this other idea makes sense.
    Should I purchase a Lennox XP19 to replace my current HP13? I know that unit requires a variable speed blower and mine is not. Can that blower be changed to variable speed? I wonder if I would be better off going that route vs the ground source? Just trying to figure the most cost effective way to go here. If his calcs are correct he says that with the ground source that I could heat and cool my 4000+ sqft house for $881 a year and have the hot water savings.
    Thanks to all,
    Troy
    I am a homeowner who upgraded to a VS furnace, however it was an entirely new purchase and install. And costly although I have never regretted the decision. These things are more subtle and complicated systems than you might think.

    Ground source heat pumps (GSHP) are the ideal in theory. But have you ever been dissatisfied with a HVAC pro and wanted to change to another pro? If you have a common type of system you have several or many to choose from, if you have GSHP is the list down to one? You might be married to the contractor, and can there be guarantees good enough you want to do that? Even if he is a top guy and you *should* be working with him for a lifetime, there is always the possibility he might exit the business and then where would you be?

    It would be real good to equally study air-to-air systems, and then make the most informed choice you are able. I would myself consider paying a contractor serious money just to perform the study and help make the best choice. In broad terms if you don't commit to a Manhattan Project size of budget, you can await and take advantage of future innovations better.

    Another thing to think of is in Missouri I think you have rather inexpensive electricity and from there the price is unlikely to go down. Something like a major shift away from coal (e.g. Gore type revolution stuff on the shoulders of everyman) could result in major price increases for coal based utilities. Not to say other utilities don't have equally big problems facing them. I am a homeowner in Texas paying about 16 cents/kwh and using a lot in the summer, you probably have it better.

    Best of luck -- Pstu

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,974
    Ground source heat pump blows away any air to air system with efficiency. Just depends on how costly your electric is vs how costly the geothermal system is as to whether or not you will benefit.

    Things to keep in mind are that your heat pump operates on a varying outdoor temperature range while to the geothermal system, the temperature is always the same.

    Also, in the summer your domestic hot water is virtually free with the use of a hot water generator option with a geothermal system. Because the "outdoor" temps are always the same, about 52 degrees, you also won't be using auxilliary heat anywhere near as often.

    With today's oil prices, converting from oil to geo is a no brainer. With total electric you'll need to do some homework.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event