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Thread: Trane Coil Size

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Trane Coil Size

    I tried searching the threads but couldnt find an answer....

    I am having a whole new system put in, furnace and a/c. I have had two trane contractors give me bids. One says they will put in a .5 ton larger coil than condensor, which seems to agree with what I have heard and read. The other says trane told them that their coils are already oversized so they will put in the same size coil and condensor.

    Any opinions? Will it make a huge difference?


    Thanks-

  2. #2
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    May 2000
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    Oversizing evap does increase capacity but it is SENSIBLE capacity not humidity control. Did a 2.5 ton job that rated at 2.25 ton with 030 coil and 29,000 BTU with 036 coil. Fortunately Tranes usually dehumidify pretty well so oversizing the evap isn't as bad as with some brands if you are in a humid climate.

  3. #3
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    Jul 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaldLoonie View Post
    Fortunately Tranes usually dehumidify pretty well so oversizing the evap isn't as bad as with some brands if you are in a humid climate.
    Thanks for your response. My non-HVAC mind did not completely understand, however. Are you saying that I would be fine either way since it's a Trane? I live in a really dry area so dehumidifying shouldn't be an issue.

  4. #4
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    In a dry climate it might be wise to go to the larger coil to get the extra capacity.

  5. #5
    it does not hurt to be .5 over but is it cost efective and will it bring more efficentcy that depends on air flow across the coil if you know air flow. you can only cool what the duct work will allow you to, if it is designed to move 3 tones of air thats all it will be able to cool. Putting a larger coil in will onley give you more area ,but only 3 tones of air will move across it and thats all you get , If you whant it to be more effective make sure your new coil comes whith a TXV control valve in it. Don't be concernd about .5 bigger is not allways better, its the motion of the air flow and how you control it that's how your coil will reach its climax of efficiant proformance.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaldLoonie View Post
    Fortunately Tranes usually dehumidify pretty well so oversizing the evap isn't as bad as with some brands if you are in a humid climate.
    Even the XL16i?

  7. #7
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    Both contractors should be able to furnish you with a manual J load calculation that will show you the specific heat load for your house. Then you will know exactly what capacity is required. Otherwise both are just guessing.

  8. #8
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    Apr 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by RyanHughes View Post
    Even the XL16i?
    The Trane XL16i sure gets a bad rap on this board. It will work better in some applications that others, but a well thougt out system can work very well. The first stage is very quiet and has an EER of 13.99 on the 3T system that I have.

    I live in a somewhat dry climate, but on a lake. In the first stage on a 40 Kbtu coil the dehumidification is not strong. In second stage it is much better. In a humid climate, the 37 Kbtu coil might work better in summer. The 40 K coil is a major improvement in heating pre the ARI cert.

    Bill

  9. #9
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    Jan 2008
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    Ask each dealer to print the Performance data for each coil. This way you can see what SEER rating and performace is. With Trane coils you almost always have to oversize the coil to get the SEER rating up.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by RyanHughes View Post
    Even the XL16i?
    Last time I looked, not even sure what size, the SHR on low was .80 and on high was .75 where the single stage units tend to run around .7 which is about as good as you get these days. Rheem can do that, many brands are more like .75 which can mean several gallons less humidity removed on a typical day.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by eetechster View Post
    it does not hurt to be .5 over but is it cost effective and will it bring more efficiency that depends on air flow across the coil if you know air flow. you can only cool what the duct work will allow you to, if it is designed to move 3 tones of air that is all it will be able to cool. Putting a larger coil in will only give you more area ,but only 3 tones of air will move across it and that is all you get , If you want it to be more effective make sure your new coil comes with a TXV control valve in it. Don't be concerned about .5 bigger is not always better, its the motion of the air flow and how you control it that's how your coil will reach its climax of efficient performance.
    Partially correct.
    The larger coil will have less PD at the same air flow.
    This lowers static pressure, and VS blowers use less electric at lower statics.
    A standard blower will be able to move slightly more air through the same size duct work.
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