Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    42

    amount of condensate

    One of the large Grocery store's we own has not been hooked up to the city sewer system yet and all of the sanitary runs to a underground storage tank located at the back of the property which we have to have pumped out occasionally. We have a constant flow of water to the tank and have gradually narrowed it down through process of elimination to being condensate from the various Refrigeration equiptment.
    Should there be this much water? and which peices of equipment do you think is producing the majority- walkin's,displays or coffins?
    the drain lines coming off of the walkins in the rear area of the store are very cold and some are producing alot of sweat so I assumed they were experiencing constant flow.
    I have consulted with some plumbers and am considering installing pumps on those condensate lines and piping them to the nearest storm drains instead of to the the tank which run out to a storm retention pond at the rear of the property.

    Any feedback would be helpful...............

    Thanks.
    Last edited by davyboy; 07-25-2008 at 12:15 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Clovis/Fresno CA
    Posts
    254
    From the set-up ive seen you can just run it to the groung or sewer it's perfectly safe. It's just vapor in the air. Do you have any dehumidification in the store.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    257
    Each refrigeration case and walk in box coil will have a manufactures rateing in gph (gallons per hour) I think the earlier comment was correct, store RH might be in question. In this country all refrigeration condensate gets directed to storm drain system not sanitary.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    North Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    1,051
    The largest contributor of condensate is probably the air conditioning system.
    It'll be running condensate most of the time. The refrigeration will mostly only run during defrost. During normal operation of the refrigeration gear the moisture will freeze on the coil as they'll be below 32F.
    Mistakes are a part of being human. Appreciate your mistakes for what they are: precious life lessons that can only be learned the hard way. Unless it's a fatal mistake, which, at least, others can learn from. Al Franken, "Oh, the Things I Know", 2002

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Guayaquil EC
    Posts
    10,328

    Condensate From Refrigerated Fixtures...

    To my knowledge, US (and Canadian) plumbing codes require all drains from food storage or food preparation fixtures to have indirect connections to the sanitary sewer system...typically a 1" or 25 mm air gap.

    The constant flow you see from the refrigerated case drainage system therefore may include waste from prep sinks, prep room & cooler floor drains, misting systems and the like.

    Supermarkets that I have been involved with usually had an indirect waste plumbing system which included the air gap at each fixture and drainage piping that ran by gravity to a centralized indirect waste pit from which the collected waste was pumped into the sanitary system. In the past couple of decades hence, vacuum waste systems have become more popular. Here's a link which will help explain them and possibly give some insight into how to estimate indirect waste water flow:

    http://www.acornvac.com/download/Design%20ManualV_H.pdf

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    257
    Quote Originally Posted by icemeister View Post
    To my knowledge, US (and Canadian) plumbing codes require all drains from food storage or food preparation fixtures to have indirect connections to the sanitary sewer system...typically a 1" or 25 mm air gap.

    The constant flow you see from the refrigerated case drainage system therefore may include waste from prep sinks, prep room & cooler floor drains, misting systems and the like.

    Supermarkets that I have been involved with usually had an indirect waste plumbing system which included the air gap at each fixture and drainage piping that ran by gravity to a centralized indirect waste pit from which the collected waste was pumped into the sanitary system. In the past couple of decades hence, vacuum waste systems have become more popular. Here's a link which will help explain them and possibly give some insight into how to estimate indirect waste water flow:

    http://www.acornvac.com/download/Design%20ManualV_H.pdf
    I take my comment back ice, you are correct were not on storm drain, I guess its because we don't tie into sanitary directly, and all AC condensate goes to storm. As I go over the prints the refrigeration condensate system is isolated from the sanitary and is not common but ends up in the same place as sanitary. It is also against our code to tie into waste line directly.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event