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  1. #14
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    440
    Quote Originally Posted by stltechfrmtx View Post
    ?????condensation would be on the outside of the pipe???? drain has a trap, low voltage is run on the outside of the unit. return air seams arent sealed (not that I can see)???? got me, could be a number of things
    I was thinking that, like a cup of ice and drink. Still in school but I couldnt see any thing else.

    So whats the answer already?

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    The depths of hell in PHX AZ
    Posts
    1,140
    I will believe that the government is broke when the welfare checks start bouncing!!

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Darby, PA
    Posts
    561
    What's the answer!!??
    Psalm 51:10, 12

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    1,484
    It looks like some small, condensating ductwork that is piped down at 1/8" per foot into the house to me

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Davie, FL
    Posts
    211
    I like the grade A set up of that black wire...

  6. #19
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    440
    Would it be that the return air duct has no poopie on the seams? So its leaking through the return air vent?

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    636
    There is no "T" after the P-trap, the unit does not drain when it's humid, and the condensate overflows into the Return. It then follows all that nice long, waterproof Return ductwork into the home. Fun fun.
    This is what happens when I take photos of things OTHER than bad A/C installations:
    Arizona. Photographed: http://community.webshots.com/album/563042864aIFjqw

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    623
    Quote Originally Posted by rifter1 View Post
    There is no "T" after the P-trap, the unit does not drain when it's humid, and the condensate overflows into the Return. It then follows all that nice long, waterproof Return ductwork into the home. Fun fun.
    why is the T necessary

  9. #22
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    440
    Quote Originally Posted by rifter1 View Post
    There is no "T" after the P-trap, the unit does not drain when it's humid, and the condensate overflows into the Return. It then follows all that nice long, waterproof Return ductwork into the home. Fun fun.
    Even after a heavy rain humidity is only 29%.

  10. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfer View Post
    Even after a heavy rain humidity is only 29%.
    It's 01:30, it has not rained in 24 hours, take a look at the humidity and dew points:


  11. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by -459FZPE View Post
    I like the grade A set up of that black wire...
    Do you mean thermostat cable?

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Milwaukee,WI
    Posts
    1,100
    Who uses adjustable elbows and snap-lock pipe on a roof?
    ___________________________

    Chicago is an indian word for stinky!!!!!!
    -supertek65

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    636
    Why is an air vent required after a P-trap?
    Not knowing that is exactly why -- over the years -- I've had to fix so many water leaks on other people's installs.

    I've done it myself. I once installed a 10-ton Trane split in a warehouse and forgot to put a T after the p-trap. The unit won't drain. We flooded the warehouse. Luckily eveyrthing was up on palettes

    -- think of a straw in a glass of water. Put your thumb over it. Pick it up. Why doesn't the water drain? Negative air pressure is stronger than the weight of the water.

    In the case of an A/C -- the blower creates the negative pressure in the straw (PVC drain line).

    I can't tell you how many water damaged homes I've seen due to the lack of an air vent after a trap. Or, if you put the air vent before the trap, the unit won't drain either. Or, if you don't put a trap or an air vent at all.

    Every plumbing fixture in your house has or shares an air vent that sticks up out of the roof, so they can drain. Otherwise the water would stick in the pipes and not drain, against the laws of gravity.

    Common problem here.
    This is what happens when I take photos of things OTHER than bad A/C installations:
    Arizona. Photographed: http://community.webshots.com/album/563042864aIFjqw

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