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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    366

    soldering near valves

    3d heat pump installed today. all went well. was able to get SH and SC to about 15 on both, although suction press. was around 85 which i thougt to be a little high??? my question is in school we put a wet rag around the service valves while soldering next to them, and we actually poured a little water on the rag periodically to keep from damaging the seals in the valve. So i've done this on my few installs. today i had a hard time stopping a pin hole leak on the bottom of suction line with the rag on it. I finally sealed the leak with no wet rag because i couldn't get the line hot enough with it, so i was wandering is it necessary to use a wet rage to protect service valves?
    td55

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
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    11,347

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    why don't you apply for pro membership!



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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Afton, VA / Khorat, Thailand
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    2,469
    No, not necessary. A good idea to try and keep it cool as possible tho'. Technique will come with practice.....
    Tough times don't last...Tough people do.

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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,793
    a heat sink is necessary and it doesnt have to be rags, you can also use gel. Experience will help this. I always braze the bottom first so that the rising heat will help to braze when I reach the top....just my $.02
    Last edited by air2spare; 07-24-2008 at 07:40 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    366
    i'm going to apply, i have applilcation and i just need to make a copy of my EPA certificatin to send in, thanks and yea im getting better on my technique. i guess it's like soldering IC chips - get it done quickly as possible.
    td55

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    366
    has anyone every damaged a valve from soldering?? and what happened if so, whats the consequences?
    td55

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    TEXAS
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    1,701
    iv'e never had it happen to me, but i know its possible. when i broke out in residential ,condensers didn't come precharged, so you always had to wonder if there was damage. these days i'm sure you would know pretty quick when your lineset started to flood.
    "When the people find they can vote themselves money,that will herald the end of the republic" - Benjamin Franklin

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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Afton, VA / Khorat, Thailand
    Posts
    2,469
    Quote Originally Posted by tonydykes55 View Post
    has anyone every damaged a valve from soldering?? and what happened if so, whats the consequences?
    I've seen it done. Once in 20 yrs. Maybe like an eclipse. Rare I'd say, unless you got a really hot hand. No, really, not me. It'll blow the charge in the unit which might mess up your Monday, but cool to watch. ... Then you'll have to replace the valve. Your boss might not be lovin' it......

    Other than that, no big deal............
    Tough times don't last...Tough people do.

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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,064
    If you over heat the valve. You'll know it, teh vlave will be hard to open.
    Over heat it more yet, and it won't seat if you have to close it.
    I think you ned to get it real real hot to blow the charge.
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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    54
    King valves has teflon seals in them and if you get them to hot they will not seal and reff. will leak out the top of the valve.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Houston,TX
    Posts
    32
    Try a product called Thermal Trap. It comes in a tube like tooth paste and works really well !

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    366
    thanks for the info. now for the second question. the larger lines require more heat so how do "you" adjust for more heat? a bigger tip, more oxygen, more acet and oxy, larger flame??????
    td55

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
    Posts
    21,135
    I use the wet rag. Wrap it tightly around the valve body, be sure it is not in a place where the water will run down the pipe you are brazing. Do not forget to remove the schraders and caps before brazing, and flow a trickle of N2 through the line while you are brazing to avoid oxidation inside the lines. Makes a compressor last longer...

    As far as the suction line and liquid line; I 'strengthen' the flame on my oxy/acetylene torch just a little (add both fuel and O2) when I shift from the LL to the SL. Key for me is prep: thoroughly clean (welding sandpaper until shiny) both parts before you put then together, and they will braze quickly.

    Practice will give you the skill you need to do a quality job of brazing line-sets to coils and condensers. Remember to protect the TXV when you braze the coil...
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