Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    88

    Water A/C compressor

    This may be a stupid question but......if I turn a sprinkler on my compressor - as in put water on the ouside unit in a residential setting, would it improve the efficiency/cooling ability given the compressor is exchanging heat from indoors to out via air - water has a far better ability to absorb heat?

    I probably am not making any sense to you experts but what I am trying to say is this - it is 100 degrees outside, it seems to me a flow of water over the fins of the compressor would increase its ability to remove heat from the indoors.

    If the above is true, are there any drawbacks as in chlorinated water damages the fins etc.

    Thanks for any advice and I hope I made some sense.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,283
    This has been tried many times, many ways. Overall, not a good idea. Fins can scale up, deterioration of condenser cabinet possibly occurs faster, increased water bill offsets any gains to be had by cooler running unit, systems with a fixed restrictor metering device might actually perform worse since a decrease in head pressure might reduce cooling capacity indoors.

    Better to let it run as it was designed, and KEEP IT CLEAN!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    88
    Thank you Shop.......

    I searched the site and found some answers that all basically said what you did (I did search before posting but only found answers after I posted, sorry guys). Appreciate the help and advice.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    88
    BTW, my 3.5 ton Goodman A/C is doing just dandy cooling 1600 SF above grade and 800 SF at grade walkout basement facing south - Current Outdoor temp 96 degrees relative humidity 43%, dew point 70 degrees. Indoor temp 68.7 at 55% relative humidity.

    Not to bad, huh?

    I was just looking to save money on the electric bill.

    Thanks again.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    205

    Heh, my neighbor put aluminum reflective tape

    Quote Originally Posted by FrankA View Post
    BTW, my 3.5 ton Goodman A/C is doing just dandy cooling 1600 SF above grade and 800 SF at grade walkout basement facing south - Current Outdoor temp 96 degrees relative humidity 43%, dew point 70 degrees. Indoor temp 68.7 at 55% relative humidity.

    Not to bad, huh?

    I was just looking to save money on the electric bill.

    Thanks again.
    on the very top of the condenser box. I LMAO at him until he showed the temp around the condenser and last month's bill. It looks kinda dorky, but hey if it works.....

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Naples, Fl
    Posts
    889
    and it breaks up those venusion brain waves too

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,283
    Quote Originally Posted by FrankA View Post
    BTW, my 3.5 ton Goodman A/C is doing just dandy cooling 1600 SF above grade and 800 SF at grade walkout basement facing south - Current Outdoor temp 96 degrees relative humidity 43%, dew point 70 degrees. Indoor temp 68.7 at 55% relative humidity.

    Not to bad, huh?

    I was just looking to save money on the electric bill.

    Thanks again.
    68 degrees?? Maybe after first coming in from outdoor conditions you listed that might be comfortable, but after sitting quietly for awhile in a room that cool, I'd get a bit nippy. I keep my place at 75 degrees, humidity runs in low to mid-forties. I run a ceiling fan to cool off when I first come inside, after that I either run the fan on low or turn it off altogether, and I'm comfy. Utility bills low one hundreds so far...we're running around 17 cents/kilowatt locally. 1,800 square foot house with single pane glass, radiant barrier, R-30 attic insulation, semi-airtight barrier between attic and interior. 3 ton Frasier-Johnson condenser on a TXV. Rock n' roll.

    Now, having said all that, are you just not comfy if you set your thermostat higher than 68? If not, you might have a sizing issue with your system, duct leaks, or some other issue that is keeping you from being comfy at higher temperatures. Or maybe you just like it that cool, no matter what.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    88
    Quote Originally Posted by shophound View Post
    68 degrees?? Maybe after first coming in from outdoor conditions you listed that might be comfortable, but after sitting quietly for awhile in a room that cool, I'd get a bit nippy. I keep my place at 75 degrees, humidity runs in low to mid-forties. I run a ceiling fan to cool off when I first come inside, after that I either run the fan on low or turn it off altogether, and I'm comfy. Utility bills low one hundreds so far...we're running around 17 cents/kilowatt locally. 1,800 square foot house with single pane glass, radiant barrier, R-30 attic insulation, semi-airtight barrier between attic and interior. 3 ton Frasier-Johnson condenser on a TXV. Rock n' roll.

    Now, having said all that, are you just not comfy if you set your thermostat higher than 68? If not, you might have a sizing issue with your system, duct leaks, or some other issue that is keeping you from being comfy at higher temperatures. Or maybe you just like it that cool, no matter what.
    I am just a cool temp nut - used to pur concrete an vowed never to be hot again - yes temp is comfortable in the 70's with lower humidity, but again I hate being hot. I watch TV laying on the couch under a blanket......I'm just a nut!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Pittsburgh PA
    Posts
    37

    me too

    Quote Originally Posted by FrankA View Post
    I am just a cool temp nut - used to pur concrete an vowed never to be hot again - yes temp is comfortable in the 70's with lower humidity, but again I hate being hot. I watch TV laying on the couch under a blanket......I'm just a nut!
    Was born and raised in it, Dad was an ac tech and so am I. I feel better in the cooler temps. Just the way I was made! lol
    What was I thinking??? I never do that again!!!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Round Rock
    Posts
    3,513
    There was a guy around here who used to build water cooled condensers. They were huge. The compressor didn't sit in or around the "water chamber", he had it piped in a box 10 ft. away or so. From what I understand, they were quite pricey and if I'm not mistaken, rated at 32 SEER. They did use a pump to push water over the coils. I never messed with any of them. He would service them himself or one of his employees would.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    88
    Quote Originally Posted by bmathews View Post
    There was a guy around here who used to build water cooled condensers. They were huge. The compressor didn't sit in or around the "water chamber", he had it piped in a box 10 ft. away or so. From what I understand, they were quite pricey and if I'm not mistaken, rated at 32 SEER. They did use a pump to push water over the coils. I never messed with any of them. He would service them himself or one of his employees would.

    I'm no engineer or HVAC pro, but I'd bet you there is a simple cost effective way to run a closed loop system that would pump water around the condenser and back to the ground, in a closed/sealed system to dissipate the heat that would work to raise efficiency by leaps and bounds, if only the government would get out of the way. As in, if your pumped the water through a conductive medium, such as small copper tubes, that were integrated with the cooling fins, and returned water to the ground in a non-conductive or corrodible medium like some sort of plastic tubing, it would work.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,283
    Quote Originally Posted by FrankA View Post
    I'm no engineer or HVAC pro, but I'd bet you there is a simple cost effective way to run a closed loop system that would pump water around the condenser and back to the ground, in a closed/sealed system to dissipate the heat that would work to raise efficiency by leaps and bounds, if only the government would get out of the way. As in, if your pumped the water through a conductive medium, such as small copper tubes, that were integrated with the cooling fins, and returned water to the ground in a non-conductive or corrodible medium like some sort of plastic tubing, it would work.
    Already exists. It's called a water source (ground loop) heat pump, aka geothermal heat pump. And it ain't cheap to put in. Is pretty efficient, however.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image