Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: 20 degrees?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    15
    Post Likes

    20 degrees?

    It's my understanding that the air conditioning cannot get the house cooler than 20 degrees from the outside temperature. Is the "outside temperature" considered to be the temperature in the sun or rather in the shade or perhaps by the outdoor unit? Is 20 degrees an industry standard or just an approximation?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    I don't know
    Posts
    2,938
    Post Likes
    Where did you get your information from?

    The maximum temperature differential between inside and outside is dependant on sun exposure, insulation, windows, internal heat gain, and equipment size.
    I've discovered a natural law - everything gets progressively worse. Things only break down and become depleted. Life isn't worth living and everything is going to hell.

    Death is the messiah. Everything else is irrelevant and arbitrary.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    6,959
    Post Likes
    Depends solely on system design.

    We design ours with a comfort guarantee that says it will maintain 75* inside on a 95* day. (ambient)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    13
    Post Likes
    It's my understanding that the air conditioning cannot get the house cooler than 20 degrees from the outside temperature.


    WHAT?! Are you suggesting that homes in Arizona never get cooler than 100 degrees inside when the outside is 120?
    holy shnikeys!

    it is system design, capacity

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    70,441
    Post Likes
    I'm guessing your contractor told you that to explain with you can't maintain the temp in your house that you want.

    As others have said. the system can be designed for more or less difference.
    Varies with area.

    We generally design for 23 to 25° difference. Depending on the customer.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    reading PA
    Posts
    20
    Post Likes
    i thought that most heat loads are figured with an odt of no more than 95. i live in pa so i guess this would vary from region to reigon,

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    465
    Post Likes
    well cascade systems can get down well below -80 Fahrenheit. So I guess who ever told you that was full of s---! If you have a properly sized air conditioning system it should be able to keep you're home at any reasonable desired temp. Unless you have all you're doors and windows open.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    70,441
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by mknox View Post
    i thought that most heat loads are figured with an odt of no more than 95. i live in pa so i guess this would vary from region to reigon,
    In PA, most are done at an OD temp of 95 or less.

    In other states, 100 and higher are normal OD design temps.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor MagazineThe place where Electrical professionals meet.
Quality Home Comfort Awards