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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    174
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    Plastic condenser pad over concrete??

    I am a little surprised that my installer is suggesting installing one of those E-lite pads on top of the concrete pad that's already there... He said it'll keep the condenser a little quieter and out of any water that may be forming on concrete.

    The local inspector says there is no need for the plastic pad, but he sees nothing wrong with having it either.

    So does the plastic pad add anything, or hurt anything? If I don't use the pad, are there other options for elevating the condenser slightly off the concrete? I just don't like the "pad on pad" look too much...

    Thanks,

    Mark

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Upstate, SC
    Posts
    2,920
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    I'd just put some cork pad or something and leave it at that.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    658
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    Have the Dude pull up the existing pad andthen put the plastic pad down. It will last longer than the concrete.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Round Rock
    Posts
    3,730
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    It's your money. If you don't want the pad, then tell him not to put it down. Check to see what your codes locally are regarding condenser height above grade.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    623
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    Typically they want it to be 3-4'' above grade.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    174
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    Thanks for the replies. The concrete pad is already 3" above grade, and looks nice - so I don't need the extra height or the improved look . The installer said that the plastic will protect the bottom of the condenser from scratching against the concrete and eventually rusting - but it seems that if there are some materials made for this (cork? rubber?) that would be a nicer solution. What do folks typically use under condensers on concrete to reduce scratching or for isolation?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    2,680
    Post Likes
    Rubber furnace pads work, ours have plastic base pans anyway so we don't need to use pads unless we need to shim them for crooked concrete.
    You can't fix stupid

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    657
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    most brands have plastic feet on the bottom, but anyway the rubber pads will work
    "The things you own end up owning you. "

    Tyler Durden

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