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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    63

    Package Unit vs Split System

    OK, what are the advantages of each for residential use.

    Split systems are what are most always used. It requires longer and more skilled installation. Plus the attic seems to be the worst place for the evaporator coil to operate and be serviced.

    Reading here, a good installation is a must. So it seems a package unit would be simpler to install, easier to service, and in a more comfortable environment.

    Since I've never seen a package unit for a home, there must be an obvious reason.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,793
    split systems offer higher efficiency possibilities, Arizona has packaged units in homes

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    11,872
    I'd love to see more package units in residential applications. But I don't think H O A's would like to see the exposed duct. Yes they would be easier to repair, but I really don't think it will happen.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Western NC
    Posts
    2,504
    we have a metric asston of package units around here.

    It all goes by locations. Since we don't have basements, any crawlspace home is going to have a package unit 90% of the time.

    The only exceptions are those that want a high efficiency system, units in attics, or ones that are 30 years old and still original with the homes.
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    If you don't know, then don't do. If you don't know and still do, then be prepared to pay someone else a lot to undo what you did and then do it right.

    If you do know, then do. But do it right. Otherwise, you may not be doing it long.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Las Vegas,NV
    Posts
    746
    I have always been a fan of package units, probably because that is all we had where I grew up. Package units are very common in California, Arizona, Nevada & Utah. I feel sorry for anyone who has to climb into a hot attic in Vegas when it is over 110 outside, I much prefer being on the roof. We have alot of new construction homes in Vegas with split systems and quite a few people I know seem to have the same problem with their units losing charge every year or two or three and it always seems to boil down to careless construction practices, nails and screws through the line set etc. Another thing I notice is condensing units take alot of abuse from people, dogs and kids when they are sitting on the ground. Allready we are starting to see more efficient residential package units, it will be interesting to see how far they go with them, maybe by the time mine craps out they will have one that is comparable to the best splits.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Western NC
    Posts
    2,504
    Quote Originally Posted by sammy37 View Post
    I have always been a fan of package units, probably because that is all we had where I grew up. Package units are very common in California, Arizona, Nevada & Utah. I feel sorry for anyone who has to climb into a hot attic in Vegas when it is over 110 outside, I much prefer being on the roof. We have alot of new construction homes in Vegas with split systems and quite a few people I know seem to have the same problem with their units losing charge every year or two or three and it always seems to boil down to careless construction practices, nails and screws through the line set etc. Another thing I notice is condensing units take alot of abuse from people, dogs and kids when they are sitting on the ground. Allready we are starting to see more efficient residential package units, it will be interesting to see how far they go with them, maybe by the time mine craps out they will have one that is comparable to the best splits.
    I doubt we will see a 19+ SEER package unit anytime soon. If you notice, the higher the efficiency, the bigger the coils are allowing for better heat transfer....Now just imagine what size coil you would need in a package unit to acheive the same efficiency Really really big!!!
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    If you don't know, then don't do. If you don't know and still do, then be prepared to pay someone else a lot to undo what you did and then do it right.

    If you do know, then do. But do it right. Otherwise, you may not be doing it long.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Las Vegas,NV
    Posts
    746
    Quote Originally Posted by iraqveteran View Post
    I doubt we will see a 19+ SEER package unit anytime soon. If you notice, the higher the efficiency, the bigger the coils are allowing for better heat transfer....Now just imagine what size coil you would need in a package unit to acheive the same efficiency Really really big!!!
    Yes, you are right. I heard that a couple companies were coming out with units that are close to 18 seer, cant recall the brands at the moment, have to go back and do some research.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Las Vegas,NV
    Posts
    746
    [QUOTE=the dangling wrangler;1917644]I'd love to see more package units in residential applications. But I don't think H O A's would like to see the exposed duct. Yes they would be easier to repair, but I really don't think it will happen.[/QUOTE


    Call me nuts, but a brand new package unit with some shiney new ductwork sitting on a roof is a beautiful site!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    63
    must package units be on roofs? flat roofs are not popular in very rainy climates. common construction is slab on ground/ sloped roof. can these units sit on the ground or otherwise be compatible with our construction methods?

    if you can get one in the efficiency you want, and the ductwork up the side of your house is not offensive, seems the best and most economical way to go.

    simple, easy to install, maintain, less chance for mistakes, get that thing out of the hottest place imaginable. and they use less polluting/global warming/ozone depleting/epa licensed only/getting more expensive/freon.

    so why are they not used more often in green grass areas?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    11,872
    Quote Originally Posted by jax1 View Post

    so why are they not used more often in green grass areas?
    My guess is the architects. And, no they do not have to be on the roof.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    1,996

    I would figure with most new homes

    having attached garages, there would be more effort into hanging the split system
    air handler and evap coil in the garage. With all the pre-fab truss roofs you'd think it would make for an easier install and service down the line.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    11,872
    Quote Originally Posted by johnsp View Post
    having attached garages, there would be more effort into hanging the split system
    air handler and evap coil in the garage. With all the pre-fab truss roofs you'd think it would make for an easier install and service down the line.
    That would call for a lot more ducting.

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