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  1. #1

    Goodman or Aspen Coil?

    I have a Goodman GMV90905DXA furnace, and have received two bids on adding AC to my system. I wanted a high efficiency system, so both contractors specified a 16 SEER condenser (Goodman SSX160601A).

    However, they proposed different coils, and I wanted to see if there are any pros/cons or other surprises with either:

    One proposed a Goodman CHPF4860D6 with a separate TXV;

    The other proposed an Aspen CE60A34-240L with the factory installed TXV.

    Oddly, the bids are almost the same price, so that is not an issue. Assuming the contractors are equally competent (they have great references), is one system better than the other? Does the "all-Goodman" system offer some advantages? Does the "factory TXV" of the Aspen make it better? I have no idea what's involved in installing a TXV, but assume it's a no-brainer for the contractor?

    Would appreciate any feedback or thoughts.

    Thanks,

    Mark

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    DC Metro Area (MD)
    Posts
    3,371
    With Goodman coil:
    ARI Ref. #1047200
    11.50 EER
    15.50 SEER

    With Aspen Coil:
    ARI Ref. #1088551
    12.50 EER
    16.00 SEER

    Looks like the Aspen coil provides the better performance numbers. What are the warranties like between the two? It would be nice to have a complete Goodman system, but coil mix-matching to get better performance numbers is not uncommon practice.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    6,323
    I am very disapointed in the current generation of Goodman/Amana corporate coil. The Aspen is a much higher quality coil, however performance on the Aspen coil is not tested just determined by paperwork. If I install an Amana/Goodman unit it gets an Aspen coil.

    The only drawback is with the Aspen coil you will not get the Lifetime compressor warranty. You can get a 10-year Parts and Labor warranty I use Datacor insted of the Goodcare/Assure warranties.

    Aspen is a very high quality coil I have one in my house and have used them for more than 20-years on various products.

  4. #4
    Thanks for the quick replies! I never heard of Aspen, so was wondering if it's some "off" brand - good to know that's not the case.

    What about the built-in TXV of the Aspen - is that a nice bonus, or is it comparable to the field installed TXV with the Goodman?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,105
    If your in a humid area, I'd go with the one thats better for humidity removal.
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    6,323
    Quote Originally Posted by mark johnson View Post
    Thanks for the quick replies! I never heard of Aspen, so was wondering if it's some "off" brand - good to know that's not the case.

    What about the built-in TXV of the Aspen - is that a nice bonus, or is it comparable to the field installed TXV with the Goodman?
    I prefer they Aspen factory installed TXV.

    Beenthere the Aspen coil is going to provide excellent humodity control with the GMV furnace and a good thermostat with a humidty feature. I prefer the White Rodgers or RObertshaw stats to the Honeywell.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Posts
    2,176
    Apen coils seem to have a better "fit" into a shorter/smaller plenum as well. With the higher SEER equipment today, some of these coils are HUGE because of the coil surface area to obtain the higher SEER.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
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    68,105
    Quote Originally Posted by classical View Post
    I prefer they Aspen factory installed TXV.

    Beenthere the Aspen coil is going to provide excellent humodity control with the GMV furnace and a good thermostat with a humidty feature. I prefer the White Rodgers or RObertshaw stats to the Honeywell.
    I'll take your word on the coil.

    Can't believe you like WR stats better.
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,184
    Only issue I've seen is with some of their metal drain pans, they hold a bunch of water in. We've actually had to prop up the coils in back to make them drain better or in downflow applications, water sprays out. Most pans these days are moulded plastic and hold virtually no water. I think Aspen makes plastic pans but for some reason our local vendors order the metal.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    6,323
    Quote Originally Posted by BaldLoonie View Post
    Only issue I've seen is with some of their metal drain pans, they hold a bunch of water in. We've actually had to prop up the coils in back to make them drain better or in downflow applications, water sprays out. Most pans these days are moulded plastic and hold virtually no water. I think Aspen makes plastic pans but for some reason our local vendors order the metal.
    I am pretty sure they make both plastic and metal pans depends on the code number.

    Have you looked at the new WR t'stats, I have just never been much of a Honeywell person.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by BaldLoonie View Post
    I think Aspen makes plastic pans but for some reason our local vendors order the metal.
    I browsed Aspen's website, and it looks like some CE60 models come with metal pans, so hopefully that's what I'll get, but I'll check with the contractor.

    Is it right that the SSX160601 condenser has a two stage compressor? Is that the way to go these days, or am I going to have more trouble with it?

    Mark

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    6,323
    Quote Originally Posted by mark johnson View Post
    I browsed Aspen's website, and it looks like some CE60 models come with metal pans, so hopefully that's what I'll get, but I'll check with the contractor.

    Is it right that the SSX160601 condenser has a two stage compressor? Is that the way to go these days, or am I going to have more trouble with it?

    Mark
    Yes it does have a 2-stage compressor; the smaller units achieve 16 SEER with a single stage. One good aspect of Goodman and Amana is they achieve their stated SEER in all capacities where most other brands do not. For instance Lennox has a 21 SEER line; there are only one or two component combinations that actually make that rating. Goodman/Amana equipment makes its lie rating in all capacities. There is noting wrong with this it is just a bit of marketing deception. It is up to the contractor and homeowner to discern what they will actually receive.

    The Copeland 2-stage unloading scroll is an excellent product and with the combination of GNV9 and a good T’stat with humidity control you will be very happy and have an efficient and comfortable home.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
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    68,105
    Shouldn't have any moe problem from a 2 stage scroll then a single stage.
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