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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    80
    Quote Originally Posted by sparks View Post
    Dude, im not trying to be a *ick but that just tells you the motor is running. It doesn’t tell you anything about compression ratio or efficiency.
    Yes, but excessively high current draw (over spec) on the compressor while in steady-state might indicate a bad compressor. In our reliability testing I don't recall how high we let the units get before we flagged them for further investigation, but I recall a few obvious units measuring far beyond normal current draw in steady state.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,314
    Or could indicate a bad condenser fan motor.
    Dirty condenser coil.
    And a few other things.
    One reading seldom tells much about anything.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Cedar Grove, Wi-Sheboygan
    Posts
    1,582
    I'm concerned that the compressor may not be working properly because the (Westinghouse, 12 SEER, 2 Ton) AC unit is unable to cool down the (bedroom) zone properly. It can take upwards of 6 hours to have the unit cool down 4 degrees. My other larger (Carrier) AC unit can cool down the rest my home (DR, KIT, LR, FM, Office, Large Playroom) very quickly...cooling down 4 degrees in less than an hour.

    From the OP quote on how fast the old system would cool leads me to believe that it was over sized, now the new system installed seems to me to be the right size as he says the new system takes up to 6 hrs to cool down the home, I run my AC and it takes roughly 45 min. to drop the house 1*, he complaining it takes 6 hrs to drop his home 4* I think his system is the right size but with the compressor drawing more current than required seems to be a problem maybe with his breakers in his panel or possibly the wiring (wrong gauge) supplied.

    Did your old system when it was running have these issue's you are having now ?

  4. #17

    Old Unit

    Actually the other older larger (Carrier) AC unit that I mentioned is still a part of my Air Cooling system in my house. It handles one zone, while he other smaller (Westinghouse) AC unit handles another zone.

  5. #18

    Confused HVAC Technician attempts to determine the problem with Condensor

    Quote Originally Posted by dac122 View Post
    Yes, but excessively high current draw (over spec) on the compressor while in steady-state might indicate a bad compressor. In our reliability testing I don't recall how high we let the units get before we flagged them for further investigation, but I recall a few obvious units measuring far beyond normal current draw in steady state.
    I just had the (same) AC professional that replaced my evap coil in my (westinghouse) air handler come back out to diagnose the possible problem with the condensor. As I mentioned before the suction line is not cold to the touch.

    The technician replaced the dryer filter on the supply line (small line) near the outside unit. Per the recommendations on this forum, I did ask him if he could perform an "AC draw test" to determine if the condensor was operating properly. It appeared that he did not know what an "AC draw test" was, and said that he perform some other test involving freon and some of his suction gadgets. He claims that condenser is in good operating condition. But I (and I think he is too) very perplexed by the fact that this (2.0 Ton) unit's suction temperature remains high (at 78*) and the supply line is not very hot (only at 82*). This is compared to a suction line temperature of 51* and supply line temp of over 95* on my other (larger) AC unit that cools another zone of my home (and operates really well). The technician did say that he was making contact with the manufacturer (Nordyne (for Westinghouse)) to determine if the piston (which connects the newly replaced coil) is the proper piston for this coil. Any thoughts on what else I can do to make sure my condenser and AC system as a whole is operating properly?
    Last edited by USRHomeOwner; 07-10-2008 at 08:09 PM. Reason: correct typos

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    west point, ga.
    Posts
    328
    I'm not there but maybe they left the piston out completely.One of our installers did that before and could not figure out what the problem was.Took me ten mins to figure it out.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    224
    I hope he didn't charge it by just feeling it with his hand! Should've been a SC and SH in there somewhere!

    Barrie

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    SW Wisconsin
    Posts
    5,005
    Quote Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
    Bet he just put in the coil, without putting in the proper metering device.
    In the late 1970's or early 1980's, I went on a call where they couldn't figure out what was wrong; someone put the piston in backward, therefore, the piston legs allowed the refrigerant to bypass the orifice.

    It ran like bad compressor valves, but I knew to check the piston because I knew that could cause the same symptoms.

    No damage was done to the compressor as it ran & cooled perfectly with the piston installed correctly. A rookie tech might have condemned the compressor.

    Always check everything before condemning a compressor.
    They get far too many compressors' returned under warranty that are good.
    - Darrell

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