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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    13

    everybody but one say 4 ton!

    I had 4 contractors bid on my central air full install. 3 suggest 4 ton unit. One says a 3 ton will do. The one who suggested a 3 ton measured every room - he took his time. The other guys measured just the perimeter of the house. 3 ton guy estimated living space at 1600 sq feet, where is the rest of them estimated it to be 2000. I am located in north jersey, 50 year old cape, 7 feet ceilings upstairs, many high trees around, original windows and insulation. Do I go with a 3 or 4 ton or should I go with 3.5?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Bucks County, PA
    Posts
    86
    I would ask to see the results for the load calc of the one that did all the measuring. Did he ask you what indoor temperatures you keep thermostat at.

    All hmes are different but I live in SE PA and have a 2200 sq. ft. cape and have a 3 ton two stage heat pump. In the very hot weather we just had unit rarely went into 2nd stage.

    What do you currently have now. How did it perform in the recent stretch of high 90's? that could be a good indicator of who is right. My quess would be the 3 ton but I am only a homeowner.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    Usually the one that measured everything,did the Manual J load calculation and is correct.No contractor wants to undersize your home,many don't want to do the load calc. either.

    Of course I can't say from here,but if they are a reputable company,and stnd behind their work ,I'd go with the 3 ton company,as oversizing prevent good dehumidification.

    Ask the others to do a load calc.!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Greenville, NC
    Posts
    67
    Quote Originally Posted by alex333 View Post
    I had 4 contractors bid on my central air full install. 3 suggest 4 ton unit. One says a 3 ton will do. The one who suggested a 3 ton measured every room - he took his time. The other guys measured just the perimeter of the house. 3 ton guy estimated living space at 1600 sq feet, where is the rest of them estimated it to be 2000. I am located in north jersey, 50 year old cape, 7 feet ceilings upstairs, many high trees around, original windows and insulation. Do I go with a 3 or 4 ton or should I go with 3.5?
    Tough call. I also live in N NJ and have a 4 ton serving a 2600 sqft two story and it is perfect. I am so glad I didn't go with a 5 as some recommended. My AC is both cool AND dry. The humidity (relative) is about 50% at 74 F. I've been to other houses where it is just as cool, but feels clammy due to too big a unit to dehumidify properly.

    It sounds from you description that 3 is correct, but I am a bit nervous about 3 contractors all saying 4. Yes, 3.5 is available, but as the other poster said I'd want to see the heat load calculation data myself. Of course this may be hard for you to make sense of. PErhaps you could post some of the data here.

    Good luck,
    Rich

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    66,755
    Big difference between 1600 sq ft, and 2000 sq ft.

    You should know how big your house is in sq ft.

    If the guy saying 3 tons is correct about sq ft, he's probably correct about the size.
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