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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    13

    trane cgaf compressor

    hey guys looking for a little rigging help. I have to change a compressor 0n a cgafc60. Its a four compressor machine with two compressors per circuit. The compressor is the second one in the machine behind the suction line. I have changed these before and used various poor ways of getting the compressor out . wondering if anyone had any good methods of removing these compressors, over the suction lines. thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    SouthEastern Virginia
    Posts
    1,076
    I hope you have a crane coming to lift that sucker out. A 15 ton scroll is nothing to be man handling. Let the crane lift it out.
    It might get loud!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    55
    Redsox,

    I'm not sure if this is help......but.......... I am better with a torch than a skyhook.

    I believe you are under a slanted condenser. What I do is cut the offending lines out of the way, slip in the new pot, tilt up the oil equalizer corner and get busy with my torch and some couplings.

    If I am in the outfield with this one, please excuse me.

    Mike

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    13
    yup it has the slanted condenser which make it tough to get in.
    I like the coupling idea then I can use an engine hoist and slide right out.
    thanks I will let you know if it goes as easy as it sounds

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    600

    Ted Williams

    Instead of an engine hoist. Drill a 3/8" hole in the top rail of the unit, over the compressor to be removed.

    Bolt a 4" long Unistrut splice plate (or something similar) through this hole so it is cantilevered out a few inches.

    Attach a 3/8 eyebolt to the splice plate now sticking out the top of the unit.

    Hook a small chainfall here and you can easily pull the compressor out.


    You can also hook one end of a long sling to the bottom rail on the opposite side of the unit and string it over the top, hooking your chainfall to the other end.

    Engine hoists are more trouble then they are worth most of the time.
    You can't seem to get any reach with them and they are a pain to move around.
    Edited by powerhead on more than one occasion

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    55
    I like the way Power is thinking. One trick I use that is always available is the 4X4.

    No, I don't use the winch on my bumper, I take a locally available piece of fir that will reach across to the back of the unit. I tie that end with my rope, usually to the factory lifting eye. I then wrap one of my slings around the wood above the compressor and use a small ratchet hoist to lift it on to a 4-wheel dolly. My program is to always keep it light. I have 2-500lb ratchet hoists and a couple of nylon straps that I use to lift and pull compressors out of rack chillers and package units. I can put the whole smash in a bucket with room to spare for a wrench or two.

    I also have an assortment of eye bolts that I can put into the top frame of a fan to lift a bearing in place or a small motor. I back them up with a heavy fender washer so I don't pull them through the frame. Make sure you buy lifting eyes that are cast and not the bent over or welded type.

    If I require a lot of horizontal motion I have two trolleys that ride inside of unistrut. I can drill 2 holes and then use bolts, or all-tread if it isn't level, to attach a length of strut to the inside top of the unit. The trolleys I got were at mcmaster/carr. These are huge help for pulling rotors or sliding in coils and dampers. I can make a custom track anywhere and I forget the exact capacity but the strut will hold a lot of weight.

    And when it gets a little more serious I own my own aluminum I-beam and a couple of 1000lb trolleys. I can put 4X cribbing from the parapet to the edge of the unit to level the thing out. The beam is sold by the foot. Mine has been cut to fit a couple of jobs and the short pieces will sometimes hold a chain against a hole in the roof or wall for pulling.

    Have fun, be safe,

    Mike

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    in a tree looking in your window
    Posts
    1,166
    Hell we just unbolt the compressor, heat up the discharge joint first and push the compressor back then heat up the suction joint and pop it out and lift the thing over the piping and back in the same way, takes about a half hour and you're on the pump.
    If you dont stand behind our troops, please feel free...........to stand in front of them.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Outside The Motor City
    Posts
    666
    What ever you do dont cut the tee's trane does not have a part # and mono flow tees do not work!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    SouthEastern Virginia
    Posts
    1,076
    Is this unit on the ground or the roof? If on the ground I call a wrecker with a hydraulic boom and let him winch it up and out. The slant coil is not a big issue for me nor has it ever been. If this is a roof job, why manhandle the compressor and hoist and risk hurting yourself?
    It might get loud!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    South Jersey
    Posts
    1,461
    Quote Originally Posted by powerhead View Post

    You can also hook one end of a long sling to the bottom rail on the opposite side of the unit and string it over the top, hooking your chainfall to the other end.

    .
    Works every time!

    I've been known to use a couple of slings this way, so I center the chainfall on the compressor and avoid damageing the fan shroud and guard. I also use a couple of pieces of scrap 2x4 under the slings at the edges of the unit to spread the weight out and avoid damage to the sheet metal.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Hampton roads VA
    Posts
    51

    Compressor removal

    Trane offers a repipe kit for these compressors. They are expensive but it does save time if you need to cut them back.I dont know the part # but local trane parte store should.

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